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Personal profile

Research

Why do some adolescents avoid challenges, while others thrive at challenging school tasks? Why are some students more resilient to setbacks at school than others?

In my research program, we address these questions, with the ultimate and overarching goal to stimulate that children enjoy learning. We approach learning as a multi-level phenomenon, as learning in the complex school setting cannot be reduced to one level only. One level of importance is the neurobiology of learning, but at school it is never one isolated brain learning one isolated skill. Learning processes at the neurobiological level are shaped by a child’s individual learning history, beliefs and goals, but also by their social environment (peers, parents).

To capture the complexity of learning in school, we combine multiple levels of measurement and analysis by using different methodologies. We study neural processes related to effort and feedback processing, and how these develop, using fMRI and EEG. To also capture physiological responses during learning, we combine the lab EEG work with measuring heart rate. At schools, we have children play games on the computer, to measure learning behavior (e.g., choosing for easy or challenging tasks, responses to mistakes, explore vs exploit behavior). In addition, we use questionnaires as self-report measure of motivational constructs (e.g. goal orientation, academic motivation, mindset) and social networks (e.g. peer nominations).  In one of our projects, we take neuroscience into the classroom, using portable EEG headsets.

For more detailed information about our current projects, see: www.laboflearning.com

Teaching

Mind, Brain and Education (Bachelor 3 - Minor)

The aims of the course Mind Brain and Education are to provide an introduction into neuroeducational research, and to teach students to reflect critically on how neuroscientific research can be translated to the educational practice.

Overview: Many scientists, policymakers and teachers share the belief that knowledge of the brain is relevant to educational practice. Yet, implementing neuroscientific findings in the classroom is by no means straightforward. Experts in the different fields seem to speak a different language. This course will provide an introduction into the new scientific domain of neuroeducational research. It will highlight insights from neuroscience that are relevant to educational practice. It will try to bridge the gap between the two fields. Using examples of recent interdisciplinary studies, it will demonstrate how diverse methodological approaches, ranging from neuro-imaging laboratory experiments used in cognitive neuroscience, to the approaches used in educational sciences, can be integrated. The course will outline the ways education can be improved using knowledge of the brain, but also point to the risks involved in this endeavour, specifically the proliferation of so-called neuromyths. Topics that will be covered are for example learning and plasticity, development of cognitive skills such as reading and math, development of metacognitive and social skills, neuro-imaging methods (myths and opportunities), and ethical discussions on the use of neuro-enhancement and early biomarkers of learning disorders.

Forms of tuition: Lectures (2 per week), Tutorials (1 per week, mandatory).

Period: Semester 1, period 2. English course.

Teaching

Neuroscience and Education (Research Master Elective)

The aims of the course The aim of the course Neuroscience and Education is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate and conduct research at the interface between neuroscience and education.

Overview: Cognitive neuroscience is not a field that is located in a scientific vacuum that exclusively examines fundamental research questions of how the brain works, but also examines highly relevant research questions for practitioners. With respect to the educational setting, cognitive neuroscience examines brain processes and mechanisms that involve learning, memory, reading, and mathematics. But also meta-cognitive skills such as self-regulatory behavior that is necessary to do well in school. The objective of the current course is to provide insight into research and methodology that are at the interface between neuroscience and education. Students will learn how to integrate diverse methodological approaches, ranging from the highly controlled laboratory experiments to approaches with more ecological validity. During the entire course, students are encouraged to critically reflect on the current enthusiasm for a brain-based education. In this context, the course will specifically discuss the proliferation of neuromyths and the ethical issues arising from the neuroeducational approach. As such, the aim of the course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate and conduct research at the interface between neuroscience and education.

Forms of tuition: Lectures and tutorials. Written exam with open-end questions (50%); research proposal (50%).

Period: Semester 1, period 2. English course. This course is taught every two years. It will be taught in 2018-19, but not in 2019-20.

Ancillary activities

  • Regionaal Instituut Dyslexie (RID) | Maastricht | Adviseur | 2018-01-24 - present

Ancillary activities are updated daily

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics where Nienke van Atteveldt is active. These topic labels come from the works of this person. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

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Phonetics Medicine & Life Sciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Medicine & Life Sciences
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Auditory Cortex Medicine & Life Sciences
Cues Medicine & Life Sciences
Dyslexia Medicine & Life Sciences

Network Recent external collaboration on country level. Dive into details by clicking on the dots.

Research Output 2004 2019

Neuroimaging of learning and development: improving ecological validity

van Atteveldt, N. M., van Kesteren, M., Braams, B. & Krabbendam, L., 5 Apr 2019, In : Frontline Learning Research. p. 186-203 18 p.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Neuroimaging
Learning
Research
Neurosciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

The teenage brain: Public perceptions of neurocognitive development during adolescence

Altikulaç, S., Lee, N. C., van der Veen, C., Benneker, I., Krabbendam, L. & van Atteveldt, N., Mar 2019, In : Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 31, 3, p. 339-359 21 p.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Open Access
File
Adolescent Development
Brain
Adolescent Behavior
Neurosciences
Risk-Taking

Beliefs Behind Behaviour: A mixed methods approach to study explicit and implicit beliefs of teachers and students

de Kraker-Pauw, E., 2018, 160 p.

Research output: PhD ThesisPhD Thesis - Research VU, graduation VUAcademic

Open Access
File

Letter and Speech Sound Association in Emerging Readers With Familial Risk of Dyslexia

Plewko, J., Chyl, K., Bola, Ł., Łuniewska, M., Dębska, A., Banaszkiewicz, A., Wypych, M., Marchewka, A., van Atteveldt, N. & Jednoróg, K., 2 Oct 2018, In : Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 12, p. 1-13 13 p., 393.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Open Access
Dyslexia
Phonetics
Reading
Temporal Lobe
FHD

Approaching the Ground Truth: Revealing the Functional Organization of Human Multisensory STC Using Ultra-High Field fMRI

Gentile, F., van Atteveldt, N., De Martino, F. & Goebel, R., 18 Oct 2017, In : Journal of Neuroscience. 37, 42, p. 10104-10113 10 p.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Temporal Lobe
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain
Electrophysiology
Magnetic Fields

Activities 2016 2019

  • 2 Membership
  • 1 Editorial work

npj Science of Learning 2018 3:1 (Journal)

Nienke van Atteveldt (Associate editor)
1 Sep 2018

Activity: Peer review and Editorial workEditorial workAcademic

IBBA (Organisational unit)

Nienke van Atteveldt (Member)
1 Jan 2016

Activity: MembershipAcademic