A brief measure of social media self-control failure

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

People often fail in controlling their social media use when it conflicts with other goals and obligations. To facilitate research on understanding social media self-control failures, we constructed a brief social media self-control failure (SMSCF)-scale to assess how often social media users give in to social media temptations. Social media users (N = 405) completed a survey (including a 4-week follow-up) to test the scale's psychometric properties. The self-report SMSCF-scale showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Demonstrating its construct validity, the SMSCF-scale was moderately related to existing problematic media use and general self-control scales. Demonstrating its predictive validity, the SMSCF-scale was positively related to social media use and feelings of guilt about one's social media use and was negatively related to psychological wellbeing. The SMSCF-scale provides a useful indicator of social media self-control failure that could facilitate future research on the psychological processes underlying social media self-control failures.

LanguageEnglish
Pages68-75
Number of pages8
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume84
Issue numberJuly
Early online date3 Feb 2018
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018

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Social Media
Self-Control
Self-control
Psychology
Guilt
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results

Keywords

  • Media use
  • Scale development
  • Self-control
  • Social media
  • Temptation

Cite this

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A brief measure of social media self-control failure. / Du, Jie; van Koningsbruggen, Guido M.; Kerkhof, Peter.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 84, No. July, 07.2018, p. 68-75.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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