A cross-disorder connectome landscape of brain dysconnectivity

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Many human brain disorders are associated with characteristic alterations in the structural and functional connectivity of the brain. In this article, we explore how commonalities and differences in connectome alterations can reveal relationships across disorders. We survey recent literature on connectivity changes in neurological and psychiatric disorders in the context of key organizational principles of the human connectome and observe that several disturbances to network properties of the human brain have a common role in a wide range of brain disorders and point towards potentially shared network mechanisms underpinning disorders. We hypothesize that the distinct dimensions along which connectome networks are organized (for example, ‘modularity’ and ‘integration’) provide a general coordinate system that allows description and categorization of relationships between seemingly disparate disorders. We outline a cross-disorder ‘connectome landscape of dysconnectivity’ along these principal dimensions of network organization that may place shared connectome alterations between brain disorders in a common framework.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-446
Number of pages12
JournalNature Reviews Neuroscience
Volume20
Issue number7
Early online date24 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

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Connectome
Brain Diseases
Brain
Nervous System Diseases
Psychiatry

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A cross-disorder connectome landscape of brain dysconnectivity. / van den Heuvel, Martijn P.; Sporns, Olaf.

In: Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Vol. 20, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 435-446.

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

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