A high intake of conjugated linoleic acid does not affect liver and kidney function tests in healthy human subjects

A.J. Wanders, L. Leder, J.D. Banga, M.B. Katan, I.A. Brouwer

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is consumed widely as a supplement. It causes hepatomegaly in animals, but toxicological data in humans are limited. We therefore studied the effect of a high daily intake of CLA on liver and kidney function in healthy subjects. Twenty subjects received 14.6 g cis-9,trans-11 CLA and 4.7 g trans-10,cis-12 CLA isomers a day for 3 weeks. Liver and kidney function was measured at 0, 3, 7, 10, 16, and 21 days. Mean values of all tests remained within normal limits. Lactate dehydrogenase (mean ± SD) increased from 290.9 ± 43.6 to 322.5 ± 60.7 U/L (p = 0.04) on day 21. One subject exceeded the upper limit of normal of 450 U/L on day 21, to 472 U/L and another showed an isolated elevation to 555 U/L on day 7. γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase increased from 12.1 ± 5.9 to 13.5 ± 6.2 U/L (p = 0.002). No one exceeded the upper limit of 50 U/L for men and 40 U/L for women. A daily intake of 19.3 g CLA for 3 weeks does not produce clinically relevant effects on markers of liver and kidney function in healthy volunteers. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)587-590
Number of pages4
JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
Volume48
Issue number2
Early online date22 Nov 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

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