A Life at the Company: Oral History and Sense Making

Ronald Kroeze, Jasmijn Vervloet

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This article explores the ways that oral history can help business historians to better understand how employees experience and make sense of their life at the company in relation to a company’s identity. The research is based on two case studies. The first concentrates on Heineken. Specifically, it focuses on the closing of the Heineken brewery in Amsterdam in 1988. The second case was a commissioned project to write a book for the eightieth anniversary of the Amsterdam-based consultancy firm Van de Bunt Adviseurs. This project was concluded in 2016 with a publication that, like the research itself, was inspired by a cultural history approach and thus paid attention to founder narratives, sensemaking, and
corporate identity construction. The article shows that oral history can broaden knowledge, especially of how employees experienced life at the company and how they made sense of it while referring to the (changing) company’s identity. Through the oral history method, employees were given a voice that showed how the same events were (differently) experienced. Moreover, the oral
histories made the personal impact of abstract developments more concrete, notably issues such as internationalization, mergers and acquisitions, changing workings conditions, scaling up or down, or closure. Stories about the founders and the ample use of the family metaphor, which stood out in both cases, expressed employees’ feelings of being part of a company with a specific identity, as well as a longing for it. The article concludes with several suggestions that should be taken into account when conducting oral history research.
LanguageEnglish
Pages33
Number of pages46
JournalEnterprise and Society
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Sensemaking
Oral History
Oral history
Employees
Amsterdam
Mergers
Conducting
Longing
Historian
Working Conditions
Corporate Identity
Identity Construction
Closure
Internationalization
Cultural History
Scaling
Working conditions
Corporate identity
Identity construction
Consultancy

Keywords

  • Oral history
  • Heineken
  • Van de Bunt
  • sensemaking
  • founders
  • Storytelling
  • History
  • consultancy

Cite this

Kroeze, Ronald ; Vervloet, Jasmijn. / A Life at the Company: Oral History and Sense Making. In: Enterprise and Society. 2019 ; Vol. 20, No. 1. pp. 33
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A Life at the Company: Oral History and Sense Making. / Kroeze, Ronald; Vervloet, Jasmijn.

In: Enterprise and Society, Vol. 20, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 33.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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