A longitudinal study of age-related differences in reactions to psychological contract breach

P.M. Bal

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The current paper investigated age-related differences in the relations of psychological contract breach with work outcomes over time. Based on socio-emotional selectivity theory, it was predicted that reactions to contract breach on job satisfaction and job performance would be stronger among younger workers than older workers. This two-wave panel study among 240 employees investigated interactions of age with three types of psychological contract breach (economic, socio-emotional, and developmental), in relation to changes in job satisfaction and job performance over time. Moderated structural equation modeling showed that negative affectivity partially mediated the relationships between contract breach and job satisfaction and job performance. Moreover, the analyses supported socio-emotional selectivity theory; older workers reacted less intensely to all three types of psychological contract breach towards job satisfaction and job performance, indicating a general decreased emotional responsiveness of older workers towards the psychological contract. It is concluded that age plays an important role in how various types of psychological contract breaches relate to change in work outcomes over time.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAcademy of Management Proceedings
Pages402-407
Number of pages6
Volume2012
Edition1
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Nov 2017
EventAcademy of Management Conference, Boston, MA. - Boston, USA
Duration: 1 Jan 20121 Jan 2012

Publication series

NameAcademy of Management Proceedings
PublisherAcademy of Management

Conference

ConferenceAcademy of Management Conference, Boston, MA.
Period1/01/121/01/12

Bibliographical note

Published online 30 November 2017

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