A multilevel neo-institutional analysis of infection prevention and control in English hospitals: coerced safety culture change?

Yiannis Kyratsis, Raheelah Ahmad, Michiyo Iwami, Enrique Castro-Sánchez, Rifat Atun, Alison H. Holmes

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Despite committed policy, regulative and professional efforts on healthcare safety, little is known about how such macro-interventions permeate organisations and shape culture over time. Informed by neo-institutional theory, we examined how inter-organisational influences shaped safety practices and inter-subjective meanings following efforts for coerced culture change. We traced macro-influences from 2000 to 2015 in infection prevention and control (IPC). Safety perceptions and meanings were inductively analysed from 130 in-depth qualitative interviews with senior- and middle-level managers from 30 English hospitals. A total of 869 institutional interventions were identified; 69% had a regulative component. In this context of forced implementation of safety practices, staff experienced inherent tensions concerning the scope of safety, their ability to be open and prioritisation of external mandates over local need. These tensions stemmed from conflicts among three co-existing institutional logics prevalent in the NHS. In response to requests for change, staff flexibly drew from a repertoire of cognitive, material and symbolic resources within and outside their organisations. They crafted ‘strategies of action’, guided by a situated assessment of first-hand practice experiences complementing collective evaluations of interventions such as ‘pragmatic’, ‘sensible’ and also ‘legitimate’. Macro-institutional forces exerted influence either directly on individuals or indirectly by enriching the organisational cultural repertoire.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1138-1158
Number of pages21
JournalSociology of Health and Illness
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Safety Management
Infection Control
Safety
staff
qualitative interview
Organizations
pragmatics
manager
ability
evaluation
resources
Interviews
experience
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • infection prevention and control
  • neo-institutional theory
  • patient safety
  • safety culture

Cite this

Kyratsis, Yiannis ; Ahmad, Raheelah ; Iwami, Michiyo ; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique ; Atun, Rifat ; Holmes, Alison H. / A multilevel neo-institutional analysis of infection prevention and control in English hospitals : coerced safety culture change?. In: Sociology of Health and Illness. 2019 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 1138-1158.
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A multilevel neo-institutional analysis of infection prevention and control in English hospitals : coerced safety culture change? / Kyratsis, Yiannis; Ahmad, Raheelah; Iwami, Michiyo; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Atun, Rifat; Holmes, Alison H.

In: Sociology of Health and Illness, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.07.2019, p. 1138-1158.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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