Acculturation and suicidal ideation among Turkish migrants in the Netherlands

Ozlem Eylem, İlker Dalḡar, Burçin Ünlü İnce, Firdevs Tok, Annemieke van Straten, Leonore de Wit, Ad J.F.M. Kerkhof, Kamaldeep Bhui

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

More suicidal ideation and higher rates of attempted suicide are found in Turkish people when compared with the general population in Europe. Acculturation processes and related distress may explain an elevated risk of suicide. The current study investigates the association between acculturation and suicidal ideation among Turkish migrants in the Netherlands. The mediating effect of hopelessness and moderating effect of secure attachment are also examined. A total of 185 Turkish migrants living in the Netherlands were recruited through social media and through liaison with community groups. They completed an online survey including validated measures of suicidal ideation, hopelessness, acculturation and attachment style. Mediation and moderation analyses were tested using bootstrapping. Higher participation was associated with less hopelessness and less suicidal ideation. Greater maintenance of one's ethnic culture was associated with higher hopelessness and higher suicidal ideation. Greater participation was associated with less suicidal ideation particularly amongst those with less secure attachment styles. Turkish migrants who participate in the host culture may have a lower risk of developing suicidal thinking. Participation may protect against suicidal thinking, particularly among those with less secure attachment styles.

LanguageEnglish
Pages71-77
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume275
Early online date1 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Suicidal Ideation
Netherlands
Social Media
Attempted Suicide
Suicide
Population

Keywords

  • Hopelessness
  • Maintenance
  • Migration
  • Participation
  • Secure attachment
  • Turkish

Cite this

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Acculturation and suicidal ideation among Turkish migrants in the Netherlands . / Eylem, Ozlem; Dalḡar, İlker; İnce, Burçin Ünlü; Tok, Firdevs; van Straten, Annemieke; de Wit, Leonore; Kerkhof, Ad J.F.M.; Bhui, Kamaldeep.

In: Psychiatry Research, Vol. 275, 05.2019, p. 71-77.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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