Acute lage rugpijn: Actief blijven, NSAID's en spierverslappers effectief, bedrust en specifieke oefeningen niet effectief; resultaten van systematische reviews

Translated title of the contribution: Acute low back pain: Staying active, NSAIDs and muscle relaxants effective, bed rest and specific exercises not effective; results of systematic reviews

M. W. Van Tulder*, B. W. Koes, W. J.J. Assendelft, L. M. Bouter, J. Daams, J. R. Van Der Laan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective. To inventory the current state of the art regarding the effectiveness of conservative treatment of acute low back pain. Design. Systematic reviews. Method. The relevant literature from the period January 1966-September 1999 was retrieved via Medline, Embase, Psychlit and the Cochrane Library and via reference lists in the articles found. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using criteria for internal validity. On the basis of the number of examinations, their quality and the consistency of the findings, conclusions were subdivided into four levels of strength of scientific evidence. Results. Approximately two-thirds of the randomised trials in the field of back pain were of poor methodological quality. There was strong evidence that advice to stay active, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and muscle relaxants were effective in acute low back pain. There was also strong evidence that bed rest and specific exercises were not effective in acute low back pain. Strong evidence for effectiveness of many other commonly used interventions was lacking.

Translated title of the contributionAcute low back pain: Staying active, NSAIDs and muscle relaxants effective, bed rest and specific exercises not effective; results of systematic reviews
Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)1484-1489
Number of pages6
JournalNederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde
Volume144
Issue number31
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jul 2000
Externally publishedYes

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