Adaptation of physiological cross-sectional area and serial number of sarcomeres after tendon transfer of rat muscle

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Abstract

Tendon transfer surgery to a new extensor insertion was performed for musculus flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) of young adult rats, after which animals were allowed to recover. Mechanical properties and adaptive effects on body mass, bone growth, serial number of sarcomeres, and muscle physiological cross-sectional area were studied. Between the transfer and control groups, no differences were found for body mass and forearm length growth. In contrast, transferred muscles had a 19% smaller physiological cross-sectional area and 25% fewer sarcomeres in series within its muscle fibers than control muscles, i.e., a deficit in muscle belly growth is present. Our present results confirm our the length of previous work showing a limited capability of changing the adapted transferred FCU muscle belly, as the muscle-tendon complex is stretched, so that most of the acute FCU length change must originate from the tendon. This should most likely be attributed to surgery-related additional and/or altered connective tissue linkages at the muscle-tendon boundary. The substantially increased FCU tendon length found, after recovery from surgery and adaptation to the conditions of the transferred position, is likely to be related to such enhanced stretching of the FCU tendon.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-255
JournalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
Volume26
Issue number3
Early online date18 Feb 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Tendon Transfer
Physiological Adaptation
Sarcomeres
Muscles
Tendons
Bone Development
Growth
Forearm
Connective Tissue
Young Adult
Control Groups

Cite this

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title = "Adaptation of physiological cross-sectional area and serial number of sarcomeres after tendon transfer of rat muscle",
abstract = "Tendon transfer surgery to a new extensor insertion was performed for musculus flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) of young adult rats, after which animals were allowed to recover. Mechanical properties and adaptive effects on body mass, bone growth, serial number of sarcomeres, and muscle physiological cross-sectional area were studied. Between the transfer and control groups, no differences were found for body mass and forearm length growth. In contrast, transferred muscles had a 19{\%} smaller physiological cross-sectional area and 25{\%} fewer sarcomeres in series within its muscle fibers than control muscles, i.e., a deficit in muscle belly growth is present. Our present results confirm our the length of previous work showing a limited capability of changing the adapted transferred FCU muscle belly, as the muscle-tendon complex is stretched, so that most of the acute FCU length change must originate from the tendon. This should most likely be attributed to surgery-related additional and/or altered connective tissue linkages at the muscle-tendon boundary. The substantially increased FCU tendon length found, after recovery from surgery and adaptation to the conditions of the transferred position, is likely to be related to such enhanced stretching of the FCU tendon.",
author = "P.A.J.B.M. Huijing and H. Maas",
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pages = "244--255",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Adaptation of physiological cross-sectional area and serial number of sarcomeres after tendon transfer of rat muscle

AU - Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

AU - Maas, H.

PY - 2016

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N2 - Tendon transfer surgery to a new extensor insertion was performed for musculus flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) of young adult rats, after which animals were allowed to recover. Mechanical properties and adaptive effects on body mass, bone growth, serial number of sarcomeres, and muscle physiological cross-sectional area were studied. Between the transfer and control groups, no differences were found for body mass and forearm length growth. In contrast, transferred muscles had a 19% smaller physiological cross-sectional area and 25% fewer sarcomeres in series within its muscle fibers than control muscles, i.e., a deficit in muscle belly growth is present. Our present results confirm our the length of previous work showing a limited capability of changing the adapted transferred FCU muscle belly, as the muscle-tendon complex is stretched, so that most of the acute FCU length change must originate from the tendon. This should most likely be attributed to surgery-related additional and/or altered connective tissue linkages at the muscle-tendon boundary. The substantially increased FCU tendon length found, after recovery from surgery and adaptation to the conditions of the transferred position, is likely to be related to such enhanced stretching of the FCU tendon.

AB - Tendon transfer surgery to a new extensor insertion was performed for musculus flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) of young adult rats, after which animals were allowed to recover. Mechanical properties and adaptive effects on body mass, bone growth, serial number of sarcomeres, and muscle physiological cross-sectional area were studied. Between the transfer and control groups, no differences were found for body mass and forearm length growth. In contrast, transferred muscles had a 19% smaller physiological cross-sectional area and 25% fewer sarcomeres in series within its muscle fibers than control muscles, i.e., a deficit in muscle belly growth is present. Our present results confirm our the length of previous work showing a limited capability of changing the adapted transferred FCU muscle belly, as the muscle-tendon complex is stretched, so that most of the acute FCU length change must originate from the tendon. This should most likely be attributed to surgery-related additional and/or altered connective tissue linkages at the muscle-tendon boundary. The substantially increased FCU tendon length found, after recovery from surgery and adaptation to the conditions of the transferred position, is likely to be related to such enhanced stretching of the FCU tendon.

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DO - 10.1111/sms.12431

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SN - 0905-7188

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