Advancing an understanding of the body amid transition from a military life

J.M. Grimell, Mariecke van den Berg

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

In this article, we explore the process of transitions from a military life to a civilian life. Making use of the concepts offered by Dialogical Self Theory, we explore how individuals negotiate the acquisition of new, civilian identities by integrating different, sometimes conflicting, cultural I-positions. Moreover, in this article, we explore how this narrative process is reflected through embodied processes of becoming civilian. We do so by presenting an in-depth analysis of two case studies: that of former Lieutenant Peter, who fully transitions to civilian life, and of Sergeant Emma, who opts for a hybrid outcome, combining a civilian job with working as an instructor in the military. We will argue that the narrative and embodied process of transition are intertwined in self-identity work, and that attention to the specifics of this entanglement can be useful for professionals who counsel military personnel who transition to civilian life.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
JournalCulture and Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Military
narrative
Military Personnel
instructor
personnel

Keywords

  • Veterans
  • body
  • dialogical self
  • identity
  • military
  • transition

Cite this

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Advancing an understanding of the body amid transition from a military life. / Grimell, J.M.; van den Berg, Mariecke .

In: Culture and Psychology, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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