Age and Gender Effects in Sensitivity to Social Rewards in Adolescents and Young Adults

Sibel Altikulaç, Marieke G.N. Bos, Lucy Foulkes, Eveline A. Crone, Jorien van Hoorn

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Adolescence is a sensitive period for socio-cultural processing and a vast literature has established that adolescents are exceptionally attuned to the social context. Theoretical accounts posit that the social reward of social interactions plays a large role in adolescent sensitivity to the social context. Yet, to date it is unclear how sensitivity to social reward develops across adolescence and young adulthood and whether there are gender differences. The present cross-sectional study (N = 271 participants, age 11–28 years) examined age and gender effects in self-reported sensitivity to different types of social rewards. In order to achieve this aim, the Dutch Social Reward Questionnaire for Adolescents was validated. Findings revealed that each type of social reward was characterized by distinct age and gender effects. Feeling rewarded by gaining positive attention from others showed a peak in late adolescence, while enjoying positive reciprocal relationships with others showed a linear increase with age. Enjoying cruel behavior toward others decreased with age for girls, while boys showed no changes with age and reported higher levels across ages. Reward from giving others control showed a mid-adolescent dip, while enjoying group interactions did not show any changes with age. Taken together, the results imply that the social reward of social interactions is a nuanced and complex construct, which encompasses multiple components that show unique effects with age and gender. These findings enable us to gain further traction on the ubiquitous effects of the social context on decision-making in adolescent’s lives.

Original languageEnglish
Article number171
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Volume13
Issue numberJULY
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jul 2019

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Reward
Young Adult
Interpersonal Relations
Traction
Decision Making
Emotions
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • age
  • gender
  • social context
  • social reward
  • SRQ-A

Cite this

Altikulaç, Sibel ; Bos, Marieke G.N. ; Foulkes, Lucy ; Crone, Eveline A. ; van Hoorn, Jorien. / Age and Gender Effects in Sensitivity to Social Rewards in Adolescents and Young Adults. In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. JULY. pp. 1-11.
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Age and Gender Effects in Sensitivity to Social Rewards in Adolescents and Young Adults. / Altikulaç, Sibel; Bos, Marieke G.N.; Foulkes, Lucy; Crone, Eveline A.; van Hoorn, Jorien.

In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 13, No. JULY, 171, 29.07.2019, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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