Aggression as a motive for gossip during conflict: The role of power, social value orientation, and counterpart's behavior

A. E. Jeuken, B. Beersma, F.S. Ten Velden, M.T.M. Dijkstra

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Not much is known about the motives behind the use of gossip in conflict situations. We report a laboratory experiment that examined the influence of social value orientation, counterpart's behavior, and power on the motive to use gossip for indirect aggression in a conflict situation. Results showed that when participants had high power, their social value orientation determined whether they were motivated to gossip to indirectly aggress toward their counterpart: Proself participants showed a higher motivation to do so than prosocial participants. In contrast, when participants had low power, the motive to engage in indirect aggression through gossip was influenced by the counterpart's behavior: Participants who encountered a competitive counterpart showed a higher motivation to aggress through gossip than participants who encountered a cooperative counterpart.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-152
JournalNegotiation and Conflict Management Research
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Aggression as a motive for gossip during conflict: The role of power, social value orientation, and counterpart's behavior'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this