Alcohol use disorders and the course of depressive and anxiety disorders

Lynn Boschloo, Nicole Vogelzangs, Wim van den Brink, Johannes H Smit, Dick J Veltman, Aartjan T F Beekman, Brenda W J H Penninx

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Inconsistent findings have been reported on the role of comorbid alcohol use disorders as risk factors for a persistent course of depressive and anxiety disorders.

AIMS: To determine whether the course of depressive and/or anxiety disorders is conditional on the type (abuse or dependence) or severity of comorbid alcohol use disorders.

METHOD: In a large sample of participants with current depression and/or anxiety (n = 1369) we examined whether the presence and severity of DSM-IV alcohol abuse or alcohol dependence predicted the 2-year course of depressive and/or anxiety disorders.

RESULTS: The persistence of depressive and/or anxiety disorders at the 2-year follow-up was significantly higher in those with remitted or current alcohol dependence (persistence 62% and 67% respectively), but not in those with remitted or current alcohol abuse (persistence 51% and 46% respectively), compared with no lifetime alcohol use disorder (persistence 53%). Severe (meeting six or seven diagnostic criteria) but not moderate (meeting three to five criteria) current dependence was a significant predictor as 95% of those in the former group still had a depressive and/or anxiety disorder at follow-up. This association remained significant after adjustment for severity of depression and anxiety, psychosocial factors and treatment factors.

CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol dependence, especially severe current dependence, is a risk factor for an unfavourable course of depressive and/or anxiety disorders, whereas alcohol abuse is not.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)476-484
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume200
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

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Depressive Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Alcoholism
Alcohols
Anxiety
Depression
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychology

Bibliographical note

Published online: 02 January 2018

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Alcohol-Related Disorders/psychology
  • Alcoholism/psychology
  • Anxiety Disorders/etiology
  • Chronic Disease
  • Depressive Disorder/etiology
  • Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Risk Factors
  • Young Adult

Cite this

Boschloo, L., Vogelzangs, N., van den Brink, W., Smit, J. H., Veltman, D. J., Beekman, A. T. F., & Penninx, B. W. J. H. (2012). Alcohol use disorders and the course of depressive and anxiety disorders. British Journal of Psychiatry, 200(6), 476-484. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.111.097550
Boschloo, Lynn ; Vogelzangs, Nicole ; van den Brink, Wim ; Smit, Johannes H ; Veltman, Dick J ; Beekman, Aartjan T F ; Penninx, Brenda W J H. / Alcohol use disorders and the course of depressive and anxiety disorders. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 200, No. 6. pp. 476-484.
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Boschloo, L, Vogelzangs, N, van den Brink, W, Smit, JH, Veltman, DJ, Beekman, ATF & Penninx, BWJH 2012, 'Alcohol use disorders and the course of depressive and anxiety disorders' British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 200, no. 6, pp. 476-484. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.111.097550

Alcohol use disorders and the course of depressive and anxiety disorders. / Boschloo, Lynn; Vogelzangs, Nicole; van den Brink, Wim; Smit, Johannes H; Veltman, Dick J; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Penninx, Brenda W J H.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 200, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 476-484.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Risk Factors

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Boschloo L, Vogelzangs N, van den Brink W, Smit JH, Veltman DJ, Beekman ATF et al. Alcohol use disorders and the course of depressive and anxiety disorders. British Journal of Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;200(6):476-484. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.111.097550