An application of the canal-otolith interaction model for tilt-coordination during a braking maneuver

Bruno J Correia Grácio, Mark Wentink, Jelte E. Bos, M. M René van Paassen, Max Mulder

    Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    In motion simulation, motion cueing algorithms are used to transform vehicle inertial cues into inertial cues that are within the simulator physical limits. Most motion cueing algorithms aim to minimize the error between these vehicle inertial cues and those generated by the simulator. Although this is one way to approach the problem, one can also aim to minimize the error between the perceived cues in the vehicle and the ones in the simulator. In this paper we designed a motion cueing algorithm based on a self-motion perception model. An experiment involving a braking maneuver was developed were subjects compared this perceptual motion cueing algorithm with a classical washout filter and a road rumble algorithm. Results showed no significant differences between the perceptual and the classical washout algorithms for both subjective and objective measures. However, we found significant differences in driving behavior between these two motion cueing algorithms and the road rumble algorithm. This study showed that inertial feedback has a positive influence in driving behavior. Therefore, this feedback might be essential to correctly simulate a braking maneuver.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference 2012
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    EventAIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference 2012 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
    Duration: 13 Aug 201216 Aug 2012

    Conference

    ConferenceAIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference 2012
    CountryUnited States
    CityMinneapolis, MN
    Period13/08/1216/08/12

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