Appetitive to aversive counter-conditioning as intervention to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior: the role of the serotonin transporter

Peter Karel, Amanda Almacellas-Barbanoj, Jeffrey Prijn, Anne Marije Kaag, Liesbeth Reneman, Michel M.M. Verheij, Judith R. Homberg

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Counter-conditioning can be a valid strategy to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior. However, this has not been tested in laboratory animals with extended cocaine-taking backgrounds nor is it well understood, which individual differences may contribute to its effects. Here, we set out to investigate the influence of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genotype on the effectiveness of counter-conditioning after extended access to cocaine self-administration. To this end, 5-HTT+/+ and 5-HTT−/− rats underwent a touch screen-based approach to test if reward-induced reinstatement of responding to a previously counter-conditioned cue is reduced, compared with a non-counter-conditioned cue, in a within-subject manner. We observed an overall extinction deficit of cocaine-seeking behavior in 5-HTT−/− rats and a resistance to punishment during the counter-conditioning session. Furthermore, we observed a significant decrease in reinstatement to cocaine and sucrose associated cues after counter-conditioning but only in 5-HTT+/+ rats. In short, we conclude that the paradigm we used was able to produce effects of counter-conditioning of sucrose seeking behavior in line with what is described in literature, and we demonstrate that it can be effective even after long-term exposure to cocaine, in a genotype-dependent manner.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)344-354
Number of pages11
JournalAddiction Biology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Reward
Cocaine
Cues
Sucrose
Genotype
Self Administration
Punishment
Laboratory Animals
Individuality
Conditioning (Psychology)

Keywords

  • cocaine
  • counter-conditioning
  • reinstatement
  • serotonin transporter
  • touch-screen

Cite this

Karel, Peter ; Almacellas-Barbanoj, Amanda ; Prijn, Jeffrey ; Kaag, Anne Marije ; Reneman, Liesbeth ; Verheij, Michel M.M. ; Homberg, Judith R. / Appetitive to aversive counter-conditioning as intervention to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior : the role of the serotonin transporter. In: Addiction Biology. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 344-354.
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Appetitive to aversive counter-conditioning as intervention to reduce reinstatement of reward-seeking behavior : the role of the serotonin transporter. / Karel, Peter; Almacellas-Barbanoj, Amanda; Prijn, Jeffrey; Kaag, Anne Marije; Reneman, Liesbeth; Verheij, Michel M.M.; Homberg, Judith R.

In: Addiction Biology, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 344-354.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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