Are poor provinces catching‐up the rich provinces in Indonesia?

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This paper examines the dynamics of socio‐economic inequalities in Indonesia over the last four decades. We apply a club convergence test to provincial panel data on four socio‐economic indicators: per capita gross regional product, the Gini coefficient, the school enrolment rate, and the fertility rate. We find that there is no single equilibrium steady state path for all these indicators in Indonesia. Instead, the data suggest that there exist two groups, with provinces converging within each of these two groups, but not between these groups. Finally, we identify the provinces that are catching‐up and those that are falling behind in terms of the various socio‐economic indicators.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-108
JournalRegional Science, Policy and Practice
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jan 2019

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socioeconomic indicator
Indonesia
panel data
fertility
school enrollment
Group
fertility rate
club
rate
province

Keywords

  • club convergenc
  • regional development
  • socio-economics disparity
  • spatial inequality

Cite this

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title = "Are poor provinces catching‐up the rich provinces in Indonesia?",
abstract = "This paper examines the dynamics of socio‐economic inequalities in Indonesia over the last four decades. We apply a club convergence test to provincial panel data on four socio‐economic indicators: per capita gross regional product, the Gini coefficient, the school enrolment rate, and the fertility rate. We find that there is no single equilibrium steady state path for all these indicators in Indonesia. Instead, the data suggest that there exist two groups, with provinces converging within each of these two groups, but not between these groups. Finally, we identify the provinces that are catching‐up and those that are falling behind in terms of the various socio‐economic indicators.",
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Are poor provinces catching‐up the rich provinces in Indonesia? / Kurniawan, H.; de Groot, H.L.F.; Mulder, P.

In: Regional Science, Policy and Practice, Vol. 11, No. 1, 29.01.2019, p. 89-108.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AB - This paper examines the dynamics of socio‐economic inequalities in Indonesia over the last four decades. We apply a club convergence test to provincial panel data on four socio‐economic indicators: per capita gross regional product, the Gini coefficient, the school enrolment rate, and the fertility rate. We find that there is no single equilibrium steady state path for all these indicators in Indonesia. Instead, the data suggest that there exist two groups, with provinces converging within each of these two groups, but not between these groups. Finally, we identify the provinces that are catching‐up and those that are falling behind in terms of the various socio‐economic indicators.

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