Arithmetic difficulties in children with cerebral palsy are related to executive function and working memory

K.M. Jenks, E.C.D.M. van Lieshout, J. de Moor

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Arithmetic ability was tested in children with cerebral palsy without severe intellectual impairment (verbal IQ ≥ 70) attending special (n = 41) or mainstream education (n = 16) as well as control children in mainstream education (n = 16) throughout first and second grade. Children with cerebral palsy in special education did not appear to have fully automatized arithmetic facts by the end of second grade. Their lower accuracy and consistently slower (verbal) response times raise important concerns for their future arithmetic development. Differences in arithmetic performance between children with cerebral palsy in special or mainstream education were not related to localization of cerebral palsy or to gross motor impairment. Rather, lower accuracy and slower verbal responses were related to differences in nonverbal intelligence and the presence of epilepsy. Left-hand impairment was related to slower verbal responses but not to lower accuracy. © 2009 Sage Publications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)528-535
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Executive Function
Cerebral Palsy
Short-Term Memory
Education
Special Education
Aptitude
Intelligence
Reaction Time
Epilepsy
Hand

Cite this

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Arithmetic difficulties in children with cerebral palsy are related to executive function and working memory. / Jenks, K.M.; van Lieshout, E.C.D.M.; de Moor, J.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 24, 2009, p. 528-535.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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