Assessing age-related balance deterioration: Visual or mechanical tasks?

L. Eduardo Cofré Lizama, Mina Arvin, Sabine M. Verschueren, Jaap H. van Dieën

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) comprises tracking of predictable and unpredictable targets moving at increasing frequencies, using centre-of-mass feedback. The mediolateral-balance-assessment was shown to be sensitive to subtle age-related balance deterioration. However, it has been suggested that performance during ground-level tasks can be more sensitive to balance deterioration. Methods: we developed a modified mediolateral-balance-assessment using tracking of surface translations with comparable waveforms (mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment) to compare age sensitivity of the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, 15 older adults (68 SD 5 yr) and 12 young adults (30 SD 4 yr) performed both tasks. Phase-shift and gain between the CoM and either the visual target or the surface displacement for the visual and the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, respectively, were calculated. To identify differences in tracking strategies between the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, phase-shift between trunk and leg angles was calculated. Findings: Overall, older adults performed worse than young across the predictable and unpredictable tracking and visual and mechanical tasks. Of all mediolateral-balance-assessment performance descriptors, a significant interaction between age and task (visual or mechanical) was only found for the mean phase-shift. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant age differences in the visual but not in the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment. Significant differences in tracking strategies were found between visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment with a greater decoupling of trunk and legs during the mechanical than the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment. Interpretation: the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment was more sensitive to age-related balance deterioration than the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, possibly because visual tracking elicits motor strategies that are more affected by ageing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-122
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Biomechanics
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

Fingerprint

Leg
Young Adult

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Balance assessment
  • Centre of mass
  • Performance
  • Postural control

Cite this

Cofré Lizama, L. Eduardo ; Arvin, Mina ; Verschueren, Sabine M. ; van Dieën, Jaap H. / Assessing age-related balance deterioration : Visual or mechanical tasks?. In: Clinical Biomechanics. 2019 ; Vol. 65. pp. 116-122.
@article{a19daa4348c846f0b803208736ed1600,
title = "Assessing age-related balance deterioration: Visual or mechanical tasks?",
abstract = "Background: Mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) comprises tracking of predictable and unpredictable targets moving at increasing frequencies, using centre-of-mass feedback. The mediolateral-balance-assessment was shown to be sensitive to subtle age-related balance deterioration. However, it has been suggested that performance during ground-level tasks can be more sensitive to balance deterioration. Methods: we developed a modified mediolateral-balance-assessment using tracking of surface translations with comparable waveforms (mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment) to compare age sensitivity of the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, 15 older adults (68 SD 5 yr) and 12 young adults (30 SD 4 yr) performed both tasks. Phase-shift and gain between the CoM and either the visual target or the surface displacement for the visual and the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, respectively, were calculated. To identify differences in tracking strategies between the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, phase-shift between trunk and leg angles was calculated. Findings: Overall, older adults performed worse than young across the predictable and unpredictable tracking and visual and mechanical tasks. Of all mediolateral-balance-assessment performance descriptors, a significant interaction between age and task (visual or mechanical) was only found for the mean phase-shift. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant age differences in the visual but not in the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment. Significant differences in tracking strategies were found between visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment with a greater decoupling of trunk and legs during the mechanical than the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment. Interpretation: the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment was more sensitive to age-related balance deterioration than the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, possibly because visual tracking elicits motor strategies that are more affected by ageing.",
keywords = "Ageing, Balance assessment, Centre of mass, Performance, Postural control",
author = "{Cofr{\'e} Lizama}, {L. Eduardo} and Mina Arvin and Verschueren, {Sabine M.} and {van Die{\"e}n}, {Jaap H.}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.04.012",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "116--122",
journal = "Clinical Biomechanics",
issn = "0268-0033",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Assessing age-related balance deterioration : Visual or mechanical tasks? / Cofré Lizama, L. Eduardo; Arvin, Mina; Verschueren, Sabine M.; van Dieën, Jaap H.

In: Clinical Biomechanics, Vol. 65, 01.05.2019, p. 116-122.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing age-related balance deterioration

T2 - Visual or mechanical tasks?

AU - Cofré Lizama, L. Eduardo

AU - Arvin, Mina

AU - Verschueren, Sabine M.

AU - van Dieën, Jaap H.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Background: Mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) comprises tracking of predictable and unpredictable targets moving at increasing frequencies, using centre-of-mass feedback. The mediolateral-balance-assessment was shown to be sensitive to subtle age-related balance deterioration. However, it has been suggested that performance during ground-level tasks can be more sensitive to balance deterioration. Methods: we developed a modified mediolateral-balance-assessment using tracking of surface translations with comparable waveforms (mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment) to compare age sensitivity of the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, 15 older adults (68 SD 5 yr) and 12 young adults (30 SD 4 yr) performed both tasks. Phase-shift and gain between the CoM and either the visual target or the surface displacement for the visual and the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, respectively, were calculated. To identify differences in tracking strategies between the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, phase-shift between trunk and leg angles was calculated. Findings: Overall, older adults performed worse than young across the predictable and unpredictable tracking and visual and mechanical tasks. Of all mediolateral-balance-assessment performance descriptors, a significant interaction between age and task (visual or mechanical) was only found for the mean phase-shift. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant age differences in the visual but not in the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment. Significant differences in tracking strategies were found between visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment with a greater decoupling of trunk and legs during the mechanical than the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment. Interpretation: the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment was more sensitive to age-related balance deterioration than the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, possibly because visual tracking elicits motor strategies that are more affected by ageing.

AB - Background: Mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) comprises tracking of predictable and unpredictable targets moving at increasing frequencies, using centre-of-mass feedback. The mediolateral-balance-assessment was shown to be sensitive to subtle age-related balance deterioration. However, it has been suggested that performance during ground-level tasks can be more sensitive to balance deterioration. Methods: we developed a modified mediolateral-balance-assessment using tracking of surface translations with comparable waveforms (mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment) to compare age sensitivity of the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, 15 older adults (68 SD 5 yr) and 12 young adults (30 SD 4 yr) performed both tasks. Phase-shift and gain between the CoM and either the visual target or the surface displacement for the visual and the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, respectively, were calculated. To identify differences in tracking strategies between the visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, phase-shift between trunk and leg angles was calculated. Findings: Overall, older adults performed worse than young across the predictable and unpredictable tracking and visual and mechanical tasks. Of all mediolateral-balance-assessment performance descriptors, a significant interaction between age and task (visual or mechanical) was only found for the mean phase-shift. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant age differences in the visual but not in the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment. Significant differences in tracking strategies were found between visual and mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment with a greater decoupling of trunk and legs during the mechanical than the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment. Interpretation: the visual mediolateral-balance-assessment was more sensitive to age-related balance deterioration than the mechanical mediolateral-balance-assessment, possibly because visual tracking elicits motor strategies that are more affected by ageing.

KW - Ageing

KW - Balance assessment

KW - Centre of mass

KW - Performance

KW - Postural control

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064559859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064559859&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.04.012

DO - 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2019.04.012

M3 - Article

VL - 65

SP - 116

EP - 122

JO - Clinical Biomechanics

JF - Clinical Biomechanics

SN - 0268-0033

ER -