Assessing the impact of the public nutrition information environment: Adapting the cancer information overload scale to measure diet information overload

Steven Ramondt, A. Susana Ramírez

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: A growing body of research suggests that exposure to too much information – particularly contradictory information that characterizes much health-related information – can lead to feeling overwhelmed. This construct has been conflated with fatalistic beliefs that are negatively associated with preventive behaviors. The objective of this study was to adapt the 8-item Cancer Information Overload (CIO) scale to assess overload of healthy diet information. Methods: Confirmatory factor analyses with a community sample of rural California adults (n = 290; 75% female; 58% Latino; 46% ≤ H.S./G.E.D.). Results: Items assessing Diet Information Overload loaded significantly on their relevant factor; factor loadings were acceptable (β >.40). The adapted original scale (CFI = 1.000, RSMEA =.000, SMSR =.022) and a shorter 5-item scale (CFI =.984, RMSEA =.051, SMSR =.026) fit well. Conclusion: The Cancer Information Overload scale was successfully adapted and shortened to measure perceptions – previously mischaracterized as fatalistic – pertaining to diet information. Improved measures distinguishing between fatalistic beliefs and outcomes of the information environment are critical. Practice Implications: Understanding information overload is important for shaping prevention messages distinct from those needed to address fatalistic beliefs. Nutrition education efforts should consider the broader – cluttered – information environment in which nutrition education and communication occurs, and public health messages may drown.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37-42
Number of pages6
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume102
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Diet
Education
Neoplasms
Rural Population
Hispanic Americans
Statistical Factor Analysis
Emotions
Public Health
Communication
Health
Research
chemotactic factor inactivator
Healthy Diet

Keywords

  • Beliefs
  • CFA
  • Diet
  • DIO scale
  • Information overload
  • Measurement
  • Nutrition

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: A growing body of research suggests that exposure to too much information – particularly contradictory information that characterizes much health-related information – can lead to feeling overwhelmed. This construct has been conflated with fatalistic beliefs that are negatively associated with preventive behaviors. The objective of this study was to adapt the 8-item Cancer Information Overload (CIO) scale to assess overload of healthy diet information. Methods: Confirmatory factor analyses with a community sample of rural California adults (n = 290; 75{\%} female; 58{\%} Latino; 46{\%} ≤ H.S./G.E.D.). Results: Items assessing Diet Information Overload loaded significantly on their relevant factor; factor loadings were acceptable (β >.40). The adapted original scale (CFI = 1.000, RSMEA =.000, SMSR =.022) and a shorter 5-item scale (CFI =.984, RMSEA =.051, SMSR =.026) fit well. Conclusion: The Cancer Information Overload scale was successfully adapted and shortened to measure perceptions – previously mischaracterized as fatalistic – pertaining to diet information. Improved measures distinguishing between fatalistic beliefs and outcomes of the information environment are critical. Practice Implications: Understanding information overload is important for shaping prevention messages distinct from those needed to address fatalistic beliefs. Nutrition education efforts should consider the broader – cluttered – information environment in which nutrition education and communication occurs, and public health messages may drown.",
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Assessing the impact of the public nutrition information environment : Adapting the cancer information overload scale to measure diet information overload. / Ramondt, Steven; Ramírez, A. Susana.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 102, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 37-42.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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