Assessment of black crowned crane and wattled crane population and spatiotemporal distribution in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia

Abebayehu Aticho, Dessalegn Obsi Gemeda, Debela Hunde Feyssa, Dereje Bekele Jiru, Abebe Beyene, Dinberu Seyoum, Denyse J. Snelder, Gudina Legese Feyisa, Shimelis Aynalem, George Archibald, Tariku Mekonnen Gutema

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The black crowned crane (Balearica pavonina) and wattled crane (Bugeranus carunculatus) are the vulnerable resident birds of Ethiopia. However, little is known about their current status, local distribution, and responses to anthropogenic effects and environmental change. This study assessed the population status, spatiotemporal distribution, and factors affecting a population of the two crane species at 18 wetland sites in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. The result shows, wetlands used by the cranes were classified as slope, riverine, depressional, and lake fringe based on topographic positions, landforms and hydrologic conditions. A total of 304 black crowned cranes and 30 wattled cranes were recorded at the wetland sites over the study period. Statistically, the population status of the two crane species were significantly (P <.01) varied among the wetland sites in the non-breeding season, whereas this was not true for the breeding season. Spatially the wattled crane population was varied significantly (P <.01) among wetland sites throughout the study period (2013 - 2017) when black crowned crane population was varied significantly (P <.01) in most years. Likely, variation in the temporal distribution of the black crowned crane population was significant (P =.001) for the study period where the distribution of wattled crane was significant for the third and final year. A regression analyses revealed the presence of multiple anthropogenic and environmental variables with significant influence on the crane population, including crane-inhabiting wetland proximity to other wetlands, wetland size, wetland buffer area ownership and use (P <.01). Generally, promising numbers of the black crowned crane and wattled crane are found in Jimma Zone. For better conservation impact, there is a need for improved spatial planning and policy support to control crane habitat fragmentation resulting from infrastructure and urban development, wetland drainage, and buffer area mismanagement.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere00459
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalGlobal Ecology and Conservation
Volume16
Early online date19 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

Fingerprint

crane
Ethiopia
wetlands
wetland
Bugeranus carunculatus
distribution
urban development
landforms
ownership
infrastructure
habitat fragmentation
anthropogenic activities
temporal variation
breeding season
drainage
buffers
planning
lakes
spatial planning
environmental factors

Keywords

  • Balearica pavonina
  • Bugeranus carunculatus
  • Habitat degradation
  • Spatiotemporal change
  • Wetland

Cite this

Aticho, Abebayehu ; Gemeda, Dessalegn Obsi ; Feyssa, Debela Hunde ; Jiru, Dereje Bekele ; Beyene, Abebe ; Seyoum, Dinberu ; Snelder, Denyse J. ; Feyisa, Gudina Legese ; Aynalem, Shimelis ; Archibald, George ; Gutema, Tariku Mekonnen. / Assessment of black crowned crane and wattled crane population and spatiotemporal distribution in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. In: Global Ecology and Conservation. 2018 ; Vol. 16. pp. 1-10.
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abstract = "The black crowned crane (Balearica pavonina) and wattled crane (Bugeranus carunculatus) are the vulnerable resident birds of Ethiopia. However, little is known about their current status, local distribution, and responses to anthropogenic effects and environmental change. This study assessed the population status, spatiotemporal distribution, and factors affecting a population of the two crane species at 18 wetland sites in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. The result shows, wetlands used by the cranes were classified as slope, riverine, depressional, and lake fringe based on topographic positions, landforms and hydrologic conditions. A total of 304 black crowned cranes and 30 wattled cranes were recorded at the wetland sites over the study period. Statistically, the population status of the two crane species were significantly (P <.01) varied among the wetland sites in the non-breeding season, whereas this was not true for the breeding season. Spatially the wattled crane population was varied significantly (P <.01) among wetland sites throughout the study period (2013 - 2017) when black crowned crane population was varied significantly (P <.01) in most years. Likely, variation in the temporal distribution of the black crowned crane population was significant (P =.001) for the study period where the distribution of wattled crane was significant for the third and final year. A regression analyses revealed the presence of multiple anthropogenic and environmental variables with significant influence on the crane population, including crane-inhabiting wetland proximity to other wetlands, wetland size, wetland buffer area ownership and use (P <.01). Generally, promising numbers of the black crowned crane and wattled crane are found in Jimma Zone. For better conservation impact, there is a need for improved spatial planning and policy support to control crane habitat fragmentation resulting from infrastructure and urban development, wetland drainage, and buffer area mismanagement.",
keywords = "Balearica pavonina, Bugeranus carunculatus, Habitat degradation, Spatiotemporal change, Wetland",
author = "Abebayehu Aticho and Gemeda, {Dessalegn Obsi} and Feyssa, {Debela Hunde} and Jiru, {Dereje Bekele} and Abebe Beyene and Dinberu Seyoum and Snelder, {Denyse J.} and Feyisa, {Gudina Legese} and Shimelis Aynalem and George Archibald and Gutema, {Tariku Mekonnen}",
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Aticho, A, Gemeda, DO, Feyssa, DH, Jiru, DB, Beyene, A, Seyoum, D, Snelder, DJ, Feyisa, GL, Aynalem, S, Archibald, G & Gutema, TM 2018, 'Assessment of black crowned crane and wattled crane population and spatiotemporal distribution in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia' Global Ecology and Conservation, vol. 16, e00459, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2018.e00459

Assessment of black crowned crane and wattled crane population and spatiotemporal distribution in Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. / Aticho, Abebayehu; Gemeda, Dessalegn Obsi; Feyssa, Debela Hunde; Jiru, Dereje Bekele; Beyene, Abebe; Seyoum, Dinberu; Snelder, Denyse J.; Feyisa, Gudina Legese; Aynalem, Shimelis; Archibald, George; Gutema, Tariku Mekonnen.

In: Global Ecology and Conservation, Vol. 16, e00459, 10.2018, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Aticho, Abebayehu

AU - Gemeda, Dessalegn Obsi

AU - Feyssa, Debela Hunde

AU - Jiru, Dereje Bekele

AU - Beyene, Abebe

AU - Seyoum, Dinberu

AU - Snelder, Denyse J.

AU - Feyisa, Gudina Legese

AU - Aynalem, Shimelis

AU - Archibald, George

AU - Gutema, Tariku Mekonnen

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