Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Polygenic Risk Scores Predict Attention Problems in a Population-Based Sample of Children

M.M. Blokhuis, C.M. Middeldorp, K.J. Kan, A. Abdellaoui, C.E.M. van Beijsterveldt, E.A. Ehli, G.E. Davies, P. Scheet, X. Xiao, J.J. Hudziak, J.J. Hottenga, B.M. Neale, D.I. Boomsma

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Clinically, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention and is among the most common childhood disorders. These same traits that define ADHD are variable in the general population, and the clinical diagnosis may represent the extreme end of a continuous distribution of inattentive and hyperactive behaviors. This hypothesis can be tested by assessing the predictive value of polygenic risk scores derived from a discovery sample of ADHD patients in a target sample from the general population with continuous scores of inattention and hyperactivity. In addition, the genetic overlap between ADHD and continuous ADHD scores can be tested across rater and age.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1123-1129
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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