Autonomy support, need satisfaction, and motivation for support among adults with intellectual disability: Testing a self-determination theory model

Noud Frielink, Carlo Schuengel, Petri J.C.M. Embregts

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The tenets of self-determination theory as applied to support were tested with structural equation modelling for 186 people with ID with a mild to borderline level of functioning. The results showed that (a) perceived autonomy support was positively associated with autonomous motivation and with satisfaction of need for autonomy, relatedness, and competence; (b) autonomous motivation and need satisfaction were associated with higher psychological well-being; (c) autonomous motivation and need satisfaction statistically mediated the association between autonomy support and well-being; and (d) satisfaction of need for autonomy and relatedness was negatively associated with controlled motivation, whereas satisfaction of need for relatedness was positively associated with autonomous motivation. The self-determination theory provides insights relevant for improving support for people with intellectual disability.

LanguageEnglish
Pages33-49
Number of pages17
JournalAmerican Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume123
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Personal Autonomy
Intellectual Disability
Motivation
Disabled Persons
Mental Competency
Autonomy
Self-determination
Model Theory
Testing
Psychology

Keywords

  • Autonomous motivation
  • Autonomy support
  • Need satisfaction
  • Self-determination theory

Cite this

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Autonomy support, need satisfaction, and motivation for support among adults with intellectual disability : Testing a self-determination theory model. / Frielink, Noud; Schuengel, Carlo; Embregts, Petri J.C.M.

In: American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Vol. 123, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 33-49.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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