Basic psychological need satisfaction of adolescents with a visual impairment: Effectiveness of a community-based mentoring program

Research output: Contribution to ConferenceAbstractAcademic

Abstract

Introduction: Psychosocial functioning of adolescents with a visual impairment can be negatively impacted due to vision related challenges experienced during the performance of daily living activities and participation in social activities. Within this randomized controlled trail, with a care-as-usual control group and two intervention-groups, the effectiveness of a mentoring program was investigated on improving psychosocial functioning of youth with a visual impairment. In addition, the potential positive effect of match similarity on the effectiveness of the program was tested by randomly assigning mentees to either a mentor with or without a visual impairment. Methods: A total of 76 adolescents (M age = 18 years, SD = 2.0, ranged between 15 and 22 years) and 36 mentors (M age = 30 years, SD = 5.9, ranged between 22 and 43 years), participated in the study. Baseline, post-test, and follow-up measurements were fitted to a multilevel growth model. Psychosocial functioning was assessed by measures of the three basic psychological needs (Chen et al., 2015), wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness. Results: Results showed that mentoring significantly improved autonomy satisfaction (B = 0.15, S.E. = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.003, 0.31, d. = .44) and competence satisfaction (B = 0.19, S.E. = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.02, 0.34, d. = .55). Mentoring had no effect on changes in relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness compared to the care-as-usual control group. No significant differences were found between mentees matched to mentors with or without a visual impairment for all outcomes. Conclusion: Mentoring appears a promising intervention to improve satisfaction with the basic psychological needs for autonomy and competence satisfaction among young people with a visual disability. However, the unexpected absence of effects on concomitant outcomes like relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness warrant caution regarding the potential for mentoring to support an adaptive transition to adulthood. The pattern of results also raises questions regarding the role of basic psychological need satisfaction as a mechanism for change in psychosocial functioning.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 23 May 2019
EventSelf-Determination conference 2019 - Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands
Duration: 21 May 201924 May 2019
http://www.sdt2019.org

Conference

ConferenceSelf-Determination conference 2019
CountryNetherlands
CityEgmond aan Zee
Period21/05/1924/05/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Vision Disorders
Psychology
Loneliness
Mentors
Self Concept
Mental Competency
Control Groups
Program Evaluation
Activities of Daily Living
Mentoring
Growth

Cite this

@conference{fdf9e111d4bd4a51858e0e425eb0c82e,
title = "Basic psychological need satisfaction of adolescents with a visual impairment: Effectiveness of a community-based mentoring program",
abstract = "Introduction: Psychosocial functioning of adolescents with a visual impairment can be negatively impacted due to vision related challenges experienced during the performance of daily living activities and participation in social activities. Within this randomized controlled trail, with a care-as-usual control group and two intervention-groups, the effectiveness of a mentoring program was investigated on improving psychosocial functioning of youth with a visual impairment. In addition, the potential positive effect of match similarity on the effectiveness of the program was tested by randomly assigning mentees to either a mentor with or without a visual impairment. Methods: A total of 76 adolescents (M age = 18 years, SD = 2.0, ranged between 15 and 22 years) and 36 mentors (M age = 30 years, SD = 5.9, ranged between 22 and 43 years), participated in the study. Baseline, post-test, and follow-up measurements were fitted to a multilevel growth model. Psychosocial functioning was assessed by measures of the three basic psychological needs (Chen et al., 2015), wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness. Results: Results showed that mentoring significantly improved autonomy satisfaction (B = 0.15, S.E. = 0.07, 95{\%} CI = 0.003, 0.31, d. = .44) and competence satisfaction (B = 0.19, S.E. = 0.08, 95{\%} CI = 0.02, 0.34, d. = .55). Mentoring had no effect on changes in relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness compared to the care-as-usual control group. No significant differences were found between mentees matched to mentors with or without a visual impairment for all outcomes. Conclusion: Mentoring appears a promising intervention to improve satisfaction with the basic psychological needs for autonomy and competence satisfaction among young people with a visual disability. However, the unexpected absence of effects on concomitant outcomes like relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness warrant caution regarding the potential for mentoring to support an adaptive transition to adulthood. The pattern of results also raises questions regarding the role of basic psychological need satisfaction as a mechanism for change in psychosocial functioning.",
author = "Eline Heppe and Agnes Willemen and Sabina Kef and Carlo Schuengel",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "23",
language = "English",
note = "Self-Determination conference 2019 ; Conference date: 21-05-2019 Through 24-05-2019",
url = "http://www.sdt2019.org",

}

Basic psychological need satisfaction of adolescents with a visual impairment : Effectiveness of a community-based mentoring program. / Heppe, Eline; Willemen, Agnes; Kef, Sabina; Schuengel, Carlo.

2019. Abstract from Self-Determination conference 2019, Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands.

Research output: Contribution to ConferenceAbstractAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Basic psychological need satisfaction of adolescents with a visual impairment

T2 - Effectiveness of a community-based mentoring program

AU - Heppe, Eline

AU - Willemen, Agnes

AU - Kef, Sabina

AU - Schuengel, Carlo

PY - 2019/5/23

Y1 - 2019/5/23

N2 - Introduction: Psychosocial functioning of adolescents with a visual impairment can be negatively impacted due to vision related challenges experienced during the performance of daily living activities and participation in social activities. Within this randomized controlled trail, with a care-as-usual control group and two intervention-groups, the effectiveness of a mentoring program was investigated on improving psychosocial functioning of youth with a visual impairment. In addition, the potential positive effect of match similarity on the effectiveness of the program was tested by randomly assigning mentees to either a mentor with or without a visual impairment. Methods: A total of 76 adolescents (M age = 18 years, SD = 2.0, ranged between 15 and 22 years) and 36 mentors (M age = 30 years, SD = 5.9, ranged between 22 and 43 years), participated in the study. Baseline, post-test, and follow-up measurements were fitted to a multilevel growth model. Psychosocial functioning was assessed by measures of the three basic psychological needs (Chen et al., 2015), wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness. Results: Results showed that mentoring significantly improved autonomy satisfaction (B = 0.15, S.E. = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.003, 0.31, d. = .44) and competence satisfaction (B = 0.19, S.E. = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.02, 0.34, d. = .55). Mentoring had no effect on changes in relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness compared to the care-as-usual control group. No significant differences were found between mentees matched to mentors with or without a visual impairment for all outcomes. Conclusion: Mentoring appears a promising intervention to improve satisfaction with the basic psychological needs for autonomy and competence satisfaction among young people with a visual disability. However, the unexpected absence of effects on concomitant outcomes like relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness warrant caution regarding the potential for mentoring to support an adaptive transition to adulthood. The pattern of results also raises questions regarding the role of basic psychological need satisfaction as a mechanism for change in psychosocial functioning.

AB - Introduction: Psychosocial functioning of adolescents with a visual impairment can be negatively impacted due to vision related challenges experienced during the performance of daily living activities and participation in social activities. Within this randomized controlled trail, with a care-as-usual control group and two intervention-groups, the effectiveness of a mentoring program was investigated on improving psychosocial functioning of youth with a visual impairment. In addition, the potential positive effect of match similarity on the effectiveness of the program was tested by randomly assigning mentees to either a mentor with or without a visual impairment. Methods: A total of 76 adolescents (M age = 18 years, SD = 2.0, ranged between 15 and 22 years) and 36 mentors (M age = 30 years, SD = 5.9, ranged between 22 and 43 years), participated in the study. Baseline, post-test, and follow-up measurements were fitted to a multilevel growth model. Psychosocial functioning was assessed by measures of the three basic psychological needs (Chen et al., 2015), wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness. Results: Results showed that mentoring significantly improved autonomy satisfaction (B = 0.15, S.E. = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.003, 0.31, d. = .44) and competence satisfaction (B = 0.19, S.E. = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.02, 0.34, d. = .55). Mentoring had no effect on changes in relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness compared to the care-as-usual control group. No significant differences were found between mentees matched to mentors with or without a visual impairment for all outcomes. Conclusion: Mentoring appears a promising intervention to improve satisfaction with the basic psychological needs for autonomy and competence satisfaction among young people with a visual disability. However, the unexpected absence of effects on concomitant outcomes like relatedness satisfaction, wellbeing, acceptance of the impairment, self-esteem, and loneliness warrant caution regarding the potential for mentoring to support an adaptive transition to adulthood. The pattern of results also raises questions regarding the role of basic psychological need satisfaction as a mechanism for change in psychosocial functioning.

M3 - Abstract

ER -