Bidirectional relationships between bullying, victimization and emotion experience in boys with and without autism

Sheida Novin, E. Broekhof, Carolien Rieffe

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Adolescents with autism are more often victims of bullying than peers without autism. Although prior work indicates that emotions play an important role, bidirectional relationships are yet unknown. This study examines the longitudinal associations of anger, fear, guilt and shame with being victimized and bullying others in adolescent boys with and without autism. On three occasions (9 months in between) 169 boys (43% with autism, 11.6 years at T1) completed self-reports. Findings show that more anger and less guilt predicted bullying behaviour, and vice versa, in both groups. In addition, more anger and fear predicted victimization. Fear was a stronger predictor in boys without autism. In turn, victimization predicted more anger, fear and shame. Especially, boys with autism reported more anger after being bullied, suggesting a tenacious vicious circle: these youngsters are likely to be angered when being bullied, which, in turn, makes them a target for bullies. Our findings provide new theoretical insights in the role emotions play in the emergence and maintenance of victimization/bullying others in boys with and without autism.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)796-800
Number of pages5
JournalAutism
Volume23
Issue number3
Early online date3 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Bullying
Crime Victims
Autistic Disorder
Emotions
Anger
Fear
Shame
Guilt
Self Report
Longitudinal Studies
Maintenance

Cite this

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title = "Bidirectional relationships between bullying, victimization and emotion experience in boys with and without autism",
abstract = "Adolescents with autism are more often victims of bullying than peers without autism. Although prior work indicates that emotions play an important role, bidirectional relationships are yet unknown. This study examines the longitudinal associations of anger, fear, guilt and shame with being victimized and bullying others in adolescent boys with and without autism. On three occasions (9 months in between) 169 boys (43{\%} with autism, 11.6 years at T1) completed self-reports. Findings show that more anger and less guilt predicted bullying behaviour, and vice versa, in both groups. In addition, more anger and fear predicted victimization. Fear was a stronger predictor in boys without autism. In turn, victimization predicted more anger, fear and shame. Especially, boys with autism reported more anger after being bullied, suggesting a tenacious vicious circle: these youngsters are likely to be angered when being bullied, which, in turn, makes them a target for bullies. Our findings provide new theoretical insights in the role emotions play in the emergence and maintenance of victimization/bullying others in boys with and without autism.",
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Bidirectional relationships between bullying, victimization and emotion experience in boys with and without autism. / Novin, Sheida; Broekhof, E.; Rieffe, Carolien.

In: Autism, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.04.2019, p. 796-800.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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