Bouncing back from psychological contract breach: How commitment recovers over time

O.N. Solinger, J. Hofmans, P.M. Bal, P.G.W. Jansen

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The post-violation model of the psychological contract outlines four ways in which a psychological contract may be resolved after breach (i.e., psychological contract thriving, reactivation, impairment, and dissolution). To explore the implications of this model for post-breach restoration of organizational commitment, we recorded dynamic patterns of organizational commitment across a fine-grained longitudinal design in a sample of young academics who reported breach events while undergoing job changes (N=109). By tracking organizational commitment up until 10weeks after the first reported breach event, we ascertain that employees may indeed bounce back from a breach incidence, albeit that some employees do so more successfully than others. We further demonstrate that the emotional impact of the breach and post-breach perceived organizational support are related to the success of the breach resolution process. Additionally, we reveal a nonlinear component in post-breach trajectories of commitment that suggests that processes determining breach resolution success are more complex than currently assumed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)494-514
JournalJournal of Organizational Behavior
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Contracts
commitment
Psychology
Psychological Models
young academics
employee
job change
event
restoration
incidence
Incidence
time
Breach
Psychological contract breach

Cite this

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Bouncing back from psychological contract breach: How commitment recovers over time. / Solinger, O.N.; Hofmans, J.; Bal, P.M.; Jansen, P.G.W.

In: Journal of Organizational Behavior, Vol. 37, No. 4, 2016, p. 494-514.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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