Bound in honor: How honor values and insults affect the experience and management of conflicts

Bianca Beersma, Fieke Harinck, Maria J.j. Gerts

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

A quasi-experiment tested the effects of honor values and the use of insults by the other party on perceived conflict, negative emotions, and intentions to behave distributively and integratively during a workplace conflict. After honor values were measured, participants read a scenario in which a conflict was described. In the scenarios, we manipulated whether the other party used an insult by describing the other party's statements such that either an insult was uttered or no insult was uttered. Consistent with our hypotheses, results showed that conflicts in which the other party used an insult lead to higher ratings of perceived conflict, more negative emotions, and stronger intentions to engage in distributive behavior than conflicts in which the other party did not use an insult in high-honor-value participants, but not in low-honor-value participants. Mediation analyses showed that the interactive effect of honor values and other party's insults on intentions to behave distributively could be explained by perceived conflict and negative emotions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-94
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Conflict Management
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2003

Fingerprint

honor
management
Values
experience
emotion
Experiments
conflict behavior
scenario
mediation
workplace
rating
experiment
Negative emotions

Keywords

  • Conflict management
  • Honor values
  • Insults

Cite this

@article{9908e0ec49fa4170831de2301ec003a0,
title = "Bound in honor: How honor values and insults affect the experience and management of conflicts",
abstract = "A quasi-experiment tested the effects of honor values and the use of insults by the other party on perceived conflict, negative emotions, and intentions to behave distributively and integratively during a workplace conflict. After honor values were measured, participants read a scenario in which a conflict was described. In the scenarios, we manipulated whether the other party used an insult by describing the other party's statements such that either an insult was uttered or no insult was uttered. Consistent with our hypotheses, results showed that conflicts in which the other party used an insult lead to higher ratings of perceived conflict, more negative emotions, and stronger intentions to engage in distributive behavior than conflicts in which the other party did not use an insult in high-honor-value participants, but not in low-honor-value participants. Mediation analyses showed that the interactive effect of honor values and other party's insults on intentions to behave distributively could be explained by perceived conflict and negative emotions.",
keywords = "Conflict management, Honor values, Insults",
author = "Bianca Beersma and Fieke Harinck and Gerts, {Maria J.j.}",
year = "2003",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1108/eb022892",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "75--94",
journal = "International Journal of Conflict Management",
issn = "1044-4068",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

Bound in honor : How honor values and insults affect the experience and management of conflicts. / Beersma, Bianca; Harinck, Fieke; Gerts, Maria J.j.

In: International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 75-94.

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bound in honor

T2 - How honor values and insults affect the experience and management of conflicts

AU - Beersma, Bianca

AU - Harinck, Fieke

AU - Gerts, Maria J.j.

PY - 2003/2/1

Y1 - 2003/2/1

N2 - A quasi-experiment tested the effects of honor values and the use of insults by the other party on perceived conflict, negative emotions, and intentions to behave distributively and integratively during a workplace conflict. After honor values were measured, participants read a scenario in which a conflict was described. In the scenarios, we manipulated whether the other party used an insult by describing the other party's statements such that either an insult was uttered or no insult was uttered. Consistent with our hypotheses, results showed that conflicts in which the other party used an insult lead to higher ratings of perceived conflict, more negative emotions, and stronger intentions to engage in distributive behavior than conflicts in which the other party did not use an insult in high-honor-value participants, but not in low-honor-value participants. Mediation analyses showed that the interactive effect of honor values and other party's insults on intentions to behave distributively could be explained by perceived conflict and negative emotions.

AB - A quasi-experiment tested the effects of honor values and the use of insults by the other party on perceived conflict, negative emotions, and intentions to behave distributively and integratively during a workplace conflict. After honor values were measured, participants read a scenario in which a conflict was described. In the scenarios, we manipulated whether the other party used an insult by describing the other party's statements such that either an insult was uttered or no insult was uttered. Consistent with our hypotheses, results showed that conflicts in which the other party used an insult lead to higher ratings of perceived conflict, more negative emotions, and stronger intentions to engage in distributive behavior than conflicts in which the other party did not use an insult in high-honor-value participants, but not in low-honor-value participants. Mediation analyses showed that the interactive effect of honor values and other party's insults on intentions to behave distributively could be explained by perceived conflict and negative emotions.

KW - Conflict management

KW - Honor values

KW - Insults

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2942677409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2942677409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/eb022892

DO - 10.1108/eb022892

M3 - Review article

VL - 14

SP - 75

EP - 94

JO - International Journal of Conflict Management

JF - International Journal of Conflict Management

SN - 1044-4068

IS - 2

ER -