Branding Strategies for High Technology Products: The Effects of Consumer and Product Innovativeness

Y. Truong, R. van Klink, G. Simmons, A. Grinstein, M. Palmer

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Choice of an appropriate branding strategy is a critical determinant of new product success. Prior work on fast-moving-consumer-goods (FMCG) prescribes that new products carry new (vs. existing) brand names to appeal to earlier adopters - a critical target for new products. However, such a prescription may not be prudent for high-technology (HT) products, as they often involve considerably more consumer perceived risk than FMCG. By drawing on Dowling and Staelin's (1994) framework of perceived-risk handling, we propose that both earlier and later adopters will favor existing brands to cope with the elevated risk associated with an innovative HT product. Two studies - one conducted in an experimental setting and the other in a field setting - support the proposition that both earlier and later adopters respond more favorably to existing (vs. new) brands on innovative HT products.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)85-91
JournalJournal of Business Research
Volume70
Issue numberJanuary
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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High technology
Product innovativeness
Branding strategy
Consumer innovativeness
New products
Perceived risk
Brand names
Prescription
New product success

Bibliographical note

Accepted

Cite this

Truong, Y. ; van Klink, R. ; Simmons, G. ; Grinstein, A. ; Palmer, M. / Branding Strategies for High Technology Products: The Effects of Consumer and Product Innovativeness. In: Journal of Business Research. 2017 ; Vol. 70, No. January. pp. 85-91.
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Branding Strategies for High Technology Products: The Effects of Consumer and Product Innovativeness. / Truong, Y.; van Klink, R.; Simmons, G.; Grinstein, A.; Palmer, M.

In: Journal of Business Research, Vol. 70, No. January, 2017, p. 85-91.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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