Breaking Traditions: An Isotopic Study on the Changing Funerary Practices in the Dutch Iron Age (800-12 bc)

L. M. Kootker*, C. Geerdink, P. W. van den Broeke, H. Kars, G. R. Davies

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Urnfields in the Dutch river area were replaced by cemeteries with a mixture of cremation and inhumation graves around the sixth century bc. This study provides the first biogeochemical evidence that the Iron Age communities were heterogeneous in terms of geological origins. The high percentage of non-locally born individuals (~48%) supports the hypothesis that the change in burial practice was the result of the influx of foreign people, who were being allowed to keep their own burial customs, whereas some of the local inhabitants adapted the burial rites of foreign cultures, leading to a heterogeneous burial rite for some centuries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)594-611
Number of pages18
JournalArchaeometry
Volume60
Issue number3
Early online date11 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

Keywords

  • Burial rite
  • Iron Age
  • Palaeomobility
  • Strontium isotope analysis
  • The Netherlands

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