Bullying and the need to belong: Early adolescents’ bullying-related behavior and the acceptance they desire and receive from particular classmates

T. Olthof, F.A. Goossens

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Abstract

Based on the notion that one of the motives underlying children's antisocial behavior is their need to belong to particular peers, it was examined how each of four types of bullying-related behavior would be related to the acceptance that 10 to 13-year-old children desired and received from same- and other-sex children with different bullying-related behavioral styles. Bullying-related behavior was assessed using a peer nomination procedure. Children rated the importance of being accepted by each particular classmate and their own acceptance of these same classmates. Among boys, antisocial involvement in bullying was related to a desire to be accepted by other antisocial boys and to actually being rejected by boys in general. Among girls, antisocial involvement in bullying was related to a desire to be accepted by boys in general. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2007.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-46
Number of pages23
JournalSocial Development
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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