Can you go the extra mile? the effect of ego depletion on endurance performance

Chris Englert, Larissa Havik, Qian Zhang, Raoul R.D. Oudejans

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We tested the assumption, that individuals (N = 13 participants) would perform worse in a cycling endurance task and would invest less effort under ego depletion than with temporarily available self-control strength. Participants' self-control strength was experimentally manipulated (non-depletion vs ego depletion, order counterbalanced) in a within-subjects design (two points of measurement, 48 hours apart) before participants performed a 6 km time trial on an indoor track. Non-parametric bootstrapping revealed that ego depletion had the most obvious effect on power output and cycling times per lap at the beginning of the time-trial. The effect of ego depletion on revolutions per minute and heart rate was large in the early parts of the time-trial, faded somewhat during the middle, while it increased again towards the end of the time-trial. The current study suggests that it might be beneficial to develop strategies which help to replenish depleted self-control strength.

LanguageEnglish
Pages505-520
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Psychology
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

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Ego
Heart Rate
Self-Control

Keywords

  • Cycling
  • Ego depletion
  • Endurance, Health
  • Self-control, Self-regulation

Cite this

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Can you go the extra mile? the effect of ego depletion on endurance performance. / Englert, Chris; Havik, Larissa; Zhang, Qian; Oudejans, Raoul R.D.

In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, Vol. 49, No. 6, 01.11.2018, p. 505-520.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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