Carbon fiber reinforced polymer dimensional stability investigations for use on the laser interferometer space antenna mission telescope

J. Sanjuán*, A. Preston, D. Korytov, A. Spector, A. Freise, G. Dixon, J. Livas, G. Mueller

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The laser interferometer space antenna (LISA) is a mission designed to detect low frequency gravitational waves. In order for LISA to succeed in its goal of direct measurement of gravitational waves, many subsystems must work together to measure the distance between proof masses on adjacent spacecraft. One such subsystem, the telescope, plays a critical role as it is the laser transmission and reception link between spacecraft. Not only must the material that makes up the telescope support structure be strong, stiff, and light, but it must have a dimensional stability of better than 1pmHz -1/2 at 3mHz and the distance between the primary and the secondary mirrors must change by less than 2.5μm over the mission lifetime. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer is the current baseline material; however, it has not been tested to the pico meter level as required by the LISA mission. In this paper, we present dimensional stability results, outgassing effects occurring in the cavity and discuss its feasibility for use as the telescope spacer for the LISA spacecraft.

Original languageEnglish
Article number124501
JournalReview of Scientific Instruments
Volume82
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

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