Church Renewal by Church Planting: The Significance of Church Planting for the Future of Christianity in Europe

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    The current secularization of Europe faces churches with two challenges: poor contex-tualization and a lack of credibility. It is clear that innovation is needed to answer these challenges. Planting new churches, instead of being a rapid way to numerical growth (which it is not, at least not in Europe), can become a road to this innovation. This is an important reason to plant churches, apart from other, ecclesiological, and missiological reasons. Church plants are ecclesial laboratories: free havens for missiological experiments. This thesis is defended with an appeal to innovation theory, with historical examples, and with some promising recent developments in one of the most secular countries in Europe: the Netherlands. © The Author(s) 2012.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-11
    Number of pages11
    JournalTheology Today
    Volume68
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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    Christianity
    Renewal
    Innovation
    Roads
    Secularization
    Experiment
    Credibility
    The Netherlands

    Cite this

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    title = "Church Renewal by Church Planting: The Significance of Church Planting for the Future of Christianity in Europe",
    abstract = "The current secularization of Europe faces churches with two challenges: poor contex-tualization and a lack of credibility. It is clear that innovation is needed to answer these challenges. Planting new churches, instead of being a rapid way to numerical growth (which it is not, at least not in Europe), can become a road to this innovation. This is an important reason to plant churches, apart from other, ecclesiological, and missiological reasons. Church plants are ecclesial laboratories: free havens for missiological experiments. This thesis is defended with an appeal to innovation theory, with historical examples, and with some promising recent developments in one of the most secular countries in Europe: the Netherlands. {\circledC} The Author(s) 2012.",
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    Church Renewal by Church Planting: The Significance of Church Planting for the Future of Christianity in Europe. / Paas, S.

    In: Theology Today, Vol. 68, No. 3, 2011, p. 1-11.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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