Close, and a cigar! - Why size perception relates to performance

R. Canal Bruland, J.R. Pijpers, R.R.D. Oudejans

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    In baseball batting, golf putting, and dart throwing, successful players estimate the size of the target object to be bigger than their less successful counterparts.While more and more empirical evidence is accumulated supporting the existence of this intriguing phenomenon, an explanation of the processes underpinning this effect remains to be provided. Here, we re-analysed data from a dart throwing experiment to examine the proposal-recently put forward by Proffitt and Linkenauger (in press)-that the variability in target-related performance may serve as a scaling metric for perceived target size which may explain why actors who perform consistently close to the target perceive the target to be bigger. Our results confirm that less variability in target-related performance in darts relates to perceiving the target as being bigger, thereby providing initial support for Proffitt and Linkenauger's proposal. © 2012 a Pion publication.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)354-356
    JournalPerception
    Volume41
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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    Cite this

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    abstract = "In baseball batting, golf putting, and dart throwing, successful players estimate the size of the target object to be bigger than their less successful counterparts.While more and more empirical evidence is accumulated supporting the existence of this intriguing phenomenon, an explanation of the processes underpinning this effect remains to be provided. Here, we re-analysed data from a dart throwing experiment to examine the proposal-recently put forward by Proffitt and Linkenauger (in press)-that the variability in target-related performance may serve as a scaling metric for perceived target size which may explain why actors who perform consistently close to the target perceive the target to be bigger. Our results confirm that less variability in target-related performance in darts relates to perceiving the target as being bigger, thereby providing initial support for Proffitt and Linkenauger's proposal. {\circledC} 2012 a Pion publication.",
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    Close, and a cigar! - Why size perception relates to performance. / Canal Bruland, R.; Pijpers, J.R.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    In: Perception, Vol. 41, 2012, p. 354-356.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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