Co-building a patient-oriented research curriculum in Canada

Tim Bell, Lidewij Eva Vat, Colleen McGavin, Malori Keller, Leah Getchell, Anna Rychtera, Nicolas Fernandez

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background Foundations in Patient-Oriented Research is a course designed and piloted in Canada to build mutually beneficial relationships for conducting patient-oriented research by ensuring that relevant stakeholders – patients, researchers, health care professionals and health system decision-makers – have a common foundational understanding of patient-oriented research, the research enterprise, and team dynamics. The curriculum was co-developed by a group of patients, researchers, patient engagement experts and curriculum development experts and involved consultations with broader groups of the relevant stakeholders mentioned above. It was designed to be delivered in a ‘co-learning format’ with classes comprised of all stakeholder groups learning together. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals involved in the process of co-developing, piloting and revising Foundations in Patient-Oriented Research. Methods An embedded case study was conducted with individuals who were involved in the co-development, pilot and revision of Foundations in Patient-Oriented Research. These individuals took on different roles during the curriculum development process, including project co-lead, developer, facilitator, and patient co-facilitator. The constant comparison method was used to inductively develop themes from the two focus group sessions. Results Discussions from the focus groups revealed the value of co-building the content, co-facilitating the course sessions, and the importance of the co-learning format. The training itself was perceived as valuable and the systematic approach to co-development was perceived as a success. Several barriers were identified, including the amount of resources, time and commitment required to complete the project. There was a notable tension between maintaining the integrity of the content and having the freedom to adapt it to local contexts. Over the course of the project, the project co-leads, developers and facilitators found that their own understanding of patient-oriented research deepened. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that co-developing a patient-oriented research curriculum increases its quality, uptake and credibility. The co-development process not only resulted in training that benefited the target learners, but also built capacity for patient-oriented research within the project co-leads, developers, facilitators and patient co-facilitators. Our findings and recommendations may provide guidance for other learning and development groups wishing to undertake a similar project.

Original languageEnglish
Article number7
JournalResearch Involvement and Engagement
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Feb 2019

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curriculum research
Curriculum
Canada
Research
Group
stakeholder
curriculum development
Learning
learning
expert
Focus Groups
Research Personnel
credibility
integrity
Patient Participation
decision maker
building
commitment
health care
curriculum

Keywords

  • Co-production/co-produced research
  • Patient and public involvement
  • Patient engagement
  • Patient-oriented research
  • Shared learning
  • Training

Cite this

Bell, T., Vat, L. E., McGavin, C., Keller, M., Getchell, L., Rychtera, A., & Fernandez, N. (2019). Co-building a patient-oriented research curriculum in Canada. Research Involvement and Engagement, 5(1), [7]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40900-019-0141-7
Bell, Tim ; Vat, Lidewij Eva ; McGavin, Colleen ; Keller, Malori ; Getchell, Leah ; Rychtera, Anna ; Fernandez, Nicolas. / Co-building a patient-oriented research curriculum in Canada. In: Research Involvement and Engagement. 2019 ; Vol. 5, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background Foundations in Patient-Oriented Research is a course designed and piloted in Canada to build mutually beneficial relationships for conducting patient-oriented research by ensuring that relevant stakeholders – patients, researchers, health care professionals and health system decision-makers – have a common foundational understanding of patient-oriented research, the research enterprise, and team dynamics. The curriculum was co-developed by a group of patients, researchers, patient engagement experts and curriculum development experts and involved consultations with broader groups of the relevant stakeholders mentioned above. It was designed to be delivered in a ‘co-learning format’ with classes comprised of all stakeholder groups learning together. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals involved in the process of co-developing, piloting and revising Foundations in Patient-Oriented Research. Methods An embedded case study was conducted with individuals who were involved in the co-development, pilot and revision of Foundations in Patient-Oriented Research. These individuals took on different roles during the curriculum development process, including project co-lead, developer, facilitator, and patient co-facilitator. The constant comparison method was used to inductively develop themes from the two focus group sessions. Results Discussions from the focus groups revealed the value of co-building the content, co-facilitating the course sessions, and the importance of the co-learning format. The training itself was perceived as valuable and the systematic approach to co-development was perceived as a success. Several barriers were identified, including the amount of resources, time and commitment required to complete the project. There was a notable tension between maintaining the integrity of the content and having the freedom to adapt it to local contexts. Over the course of the project, the project co-leads, developers and facilitators found that their own understanding of patient-oriented research deepened. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that co-developing a patient-oriented research curriculum increases its quality, uptake and credibility. The co-development process not only resulted in training that benefited the target learners, but also built capacity for patient-oriented research within the project co-leads, developers, facilitators and patient co-facilitators. Our findings and recommendations may provide guidance for other learning and development groups wishing to undertake a similar project.",
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Bell, T, Vat, LE, McGavin, C, Keller, M, Getchell, L, Rychtera, A & Fernandez, N 2019, 'Co-building a patient-oriented research curriculum in Canada' Research Involvement and Engagement, vol. 5, no. 1, 7. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40900-019-0141-7

Co-building a patient-oriented research curriculum in Canada. / Bell, Tim; Vat, Lidewij Eva; McGavin, Colleen; Keller, Malori; Getchell, Leah; Rychtera, Anna; Fernandez, Nicolas.

In: Research Involvement and Engagement, Vol. 5, No. 1, 7, 11.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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