CO2 balance of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests derived from a global database

S. Luyssaert, I. Inglima, M. Jung, A.D. Richardson, M. Reichstein, D. Papale, S.L. Piao, E.D. Schulze, L. Wingate, G. Matteucci, L. Aragao, M. Aubinet, C. Beer, C. Bernhofer, K.G. Black, D. Bonal, J.M. Bonnefond, J. Chambers, P. Ciais, B. CookK.J. Davis, A.J. Dolman, B. Gielen, M. Goulden, J. Grace, A. Granier, A. Grelle, T. Griffis, T. Gruenwald, G. Guidolotti, P.J. Hanson, R. Harding, D.Y. Hollinger, L.R. Hutyra, P. Kolari, B. Kruijt, W. Kutsch, F. Lagergren, T. Laurila

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Terrestrial ecosystems sequester 2.1 Pg of atmospheric carbon annually. A large amount of the terrestrial sink is realized by forests. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the fate of this carbon over both short and long timescales. Relevant data to address these uncertainties are being collected at many sites around the world, but syntheses of these data are still sparse. To facilitate future synthesis activities, we have assembled a comprehensive global database for forest ecosystems, which includes carbon budget variables (fluxes and stocks), ecosystem traits (e.g. leaf area index, age), as well as ancillary site information such as management regime, climate, and soil characteristics. This publicly available database can be used to quantify global, regional or biome-specific carbon budgets; to re-examine established relationships; to test emerging hypotheses about ecosystem functioning [e.g. a constant net ecosystem production (NEP) to gross primary production (GPP) ratio]; and as benchmarks for model evaluations. In this paper, we present the first analysis of this database. We discuss the climatic influences on GPP, net primary production (NPP) and NEP and present the CO
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2509-2537
    JournalGlobal Change Biology
    Volume13
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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