Cohort differences in 3-year adaptation to health problems among Dutch middle-aged, 1992-1995 and 2002-2005

D.J.H. Deeg, M. Huisman

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Midlife is a period during which ageing-related health problems first emerge. In view of increasing life expectancy, it is of great importance that people in midlife adapt to possible health problems, to be able to lead productive and engaged lives as long as possible. It may be expected that given the better circumstances in which more recent cohorts grew up, they are better equipped to adapt to health problems than earlier cohorts. This study addresses the question if the way people in midlife adapt to health problems is or is not improving in the Netherlands. The study is based on the nationally representative 1992-1993 and 2002-2003 cohorts of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (ages 55-64 years), with follow-up cycles in 1995-1996 (n = 811) and 2005-2006 (n = 829), respectively. Mastery is considered as a measure of adaptation, and 3-year change in mastery is compared in subjects without and with health problems at baseline. A rise was observed in the prevalence of diabetes, chronic lung disease, arthritis, subthreshold depression, and disability. Subjects without health problems in the recent cohort had better mastery than their counterparts in the early cohort. Regardless of cohort membership, mastery declined over 3 years for those with subthreshold depression, mild disability, chronic lung disease, and stroke. In the recent cohort only, mastery declined for those with cognitive impairment, but improved for those with heart disease. These findings do not support the expectation that recent cohorts are better equipped to deal with health problems for conditions other than heart disease. © 2010 The Author(s).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)157-165
    JournalEuropean Journal of Ageing
    Volume7
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

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    Health
    health
    heart disease
    Lung Diseases
    Heart Diseases
    Chronic Disease
    disability
    Depression
    Disease
    life expectancy
    stroke
    Life Expectancy
    Netherlands
    chronic illness
    Arthritis
    Longitudinal Studies
    Stroke

    Cite this

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    title = "Cohort differences in 3-year adaptation to health problems among Dutch middle-aged, 1992-1995 and 2002-2005",
    abstract = "Midlife is a period during which ageing-related health problems first emerge. In view of increasing life expectancy, it is of great importance that people in midlife adapt to possible health problems, to be able to lead productive and engaged lives as long as possible. It may be expected that given the better circumstances in which more recent cohorts grew up, they are better equipped to adapt to health problems than earlier cohorts. This study addresses the question if the way people in midlife adapt to health problems is or is not improving in the Netherlands. The study is based on the nationally representative 1992-1993 and 2002-2003 cohorts of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (ages 55-64 years), with follow-up cycles in 1995-1996 (n = 811) and 2005-2006 (n = 829), respectively. Mastery is considered as a measure of adaptation, and 3-year change in mastery is compared in subjects without and with health problems at baseline. A rise was observed in the prevalence of diabetes, chronic lung disease, arthritis, subthreshold depression, and disability. Subjects without health problems in the recent cohort had better mastery than their counterparts in the early cohort. Regardless of cohort membership, mastery declined over 3 years for those with subthreshold depression, mild disability, chronic lung disease, and stroke. In the recent cohort only, mastery declined for those with cognitive impairment, but improved for those with heart disease. These findings do not support the expectation that recent cohorts are better equipped to deal with health problems for conditions other than heart disease. {\circledC} 2010 The Author(s).",
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    Cohort differences in 3-year adaptation to health problems among Dutch middle-aged, 1992-1995 and 2002-2005. / Deeg, D.J.H.; Huisman, M.

    In: European Journal of Ageing, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2010, p. 157-165.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    AB - Midlife is a period during which ageing-related health problems first emerge. In view of increasing life expectancy, it is of great importance that people in midlife adapt to possible health problems, to be able to lead productive and engaged lives as long as possible. It may be expected that given the better circumstances in which more recent cohorts grew up, they are better equipped to adapt to health problems than earlier cohorts. This study addresses the question if the way people in midlife adapt to health problems is or is not improving in the Netherlands. The study is based on the nationally representative 1992-1993 and 2002-2003 cohorts of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam (ages 55-64 years), with follow-up cycles in 1995-1996 (n = 811) and 2005-2006 (n = 829), respectively. Mastery is considered as a measure of adaptation, and 3-year change in mastery is compared in subjects without and with health problems at baseline. A rise was observed in the prevalence of diabetes, chronic lung disease, arthritis, subthreshold depression, and disability. Subjects without health problems in the recent cohort had better mastery than their counterparts in the early cohort. Regardless of cohort membership, mastery declined over 3 years for those with subthreshold depression, mild disability, chronic lung disease, and stroke. In the recent cohort only, mastery declined for those with cognitive impairment, but improved for those with heart disease. These findings do not support the expectation that recent cohorts are better equipped to deal with health problems for conditions other than heart disease. © 2010 The Author(s).

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