Cold-induced metabolism

Wouter D. Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Hein A M Daanen

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose of review: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic response in infants and several animal species. In adult humans, however, its role is less clear. Here we explore recent findings on the role and variability of nonshivering thermogenesis in adults. Recent findings: Large individual differences exist in mild cold response with respect to the relative contribution of the insulative response and the metabolic (nonshivering) response. In search for the possible explanations of this variation, recent studies on potential mechanisms of nonshivering thermogenesis in humans are presented. Emphasis is given to the role of uncoupling proteins, mitochondrial ATP-synthase, and calcium cycling. The potential contribution of human skeletal muscle to nonshivering thermogenesis is discussed. The differences in nonshivering thermogenesis can partly be attributed to factors such as age, gender, physical fitness, adaptation, and diet. There are indications that genetic variation affect cold response. Summary: The implications of the observed large individual variation in cold response is that a low metabolic response to cold can partly explain increased risk to develop obesity. Both the effect of environmental factors and genetic factors on nonshivering thermogenesis require more well controlled studies. With extended knowledge on these factors it can be ascertained if a pharmacological regimen is possible which would mimic the effects of chronic cold or elevated catecholamine levels, without attendant side effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-475
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2003

Fingerprint

Thermogenesis
heat production
metabolism
Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases
physical fitness
H-transporting ATP synthase
Brown Adipose Tissue
brown adipose tissue
Physical Fitness
catecholamines
norepinephrine
Individuality
energy expenditure
Energy Metabolism
Catecholamines
skeletal muscle
long term effects
Norepinephrine
Skeletal Muscle
obesity

Keywords

  • Adaptive thermogenesis
  • Brown adipose tissue
  • Cold response
  • Energy expenditure
  • Nonshivering thermogenesis
  • Uncoupling proteins

Cite this

Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D. ; Daanen, Hein A M. / Cold-induced metabolism. In: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care. 2003 ; Vol. 6, No. 4. pp. 469-475.
@article{1d53abb8a71c4a53b454a333d4f1cdcb,
title = "Cold-induced metabolism",
abstract = "Purpose of review: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic response in infants and several animal species. In adult humans, however, its role is less clear. Here we explore recent findings on the role and variability of nonshivering thermogenesis in adults. Recent findings: Large individual differences exist in mild cold response with respect to the relative contribution of the insulative response and the metabolic (nonshivering) response. In search for the possible explanations of this variation, recent studies on potential mechanisms of nonshivering thermogenesis in humans are presented. Emphasis is given to the role of uncoupling proteins, mitochondrial ATP-synthase, and calcium cycling. The potential contribution of human skeletal muscle to nonshivering thermogenesis is discussed. The differences in nonshivering thermogenesis can partly be attributed to factors such as age, gender, physical fitness, adaptation, and diet. There are indications that genetic variation affect cold response. Summary: The implications of the observed large individual variation in cold response is that a low metabolic response to cold can partly explain increased risk to develop obesity. Both the effect of environmental factors and genetic factors on nonshivering thermogenesis require more well controlled studies. With extended knowledge on these factors it can be ascertained if a pharmacological regimen is possible which would mimic the effects of chronic cold or elevated catecholamine levels, without attendant side effects.",
keywords = "Adaptive thermogenesis, Brown adipose tissue, Cold response, Energy expenditure, Nonshivering thermogenesis, Uncoupling proteins",
author = "{Van Marken Lichtenbelt}, {Wouter D.} and Daanen, {Hein A M}",
year = "2003",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1097/00075197-200307000-00018",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "469--475",
journal = "Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care",
issn = "1363-1950",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

Cold-induced metabolism. / Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.; Daanen, Hein A M.

In: Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, Vol. 6, No. 4, 07.2003, p. 469-475.

Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cold-induced metabolism

AU - Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

AU - Daanen, Hein A M

PY - 2003/7

Y1 - 2003/7

N2 - Purpose of review: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic response in infants and several animal species. In adult humans, however, its role is less clear. Here we explore recent findings on the role and variability of nonshivering thermogenesis in adults. Recent findings: Large individual differences exist in mild cold response with respect to the relative contribution of the insulative response and the metabolic (nonshivering) response. In search for the possible explanations of this variation, recent studies on potential mechanisms of nonshivering thermogenesis in humans are presented. Emphasis is given to the role of uncoupling proteins, mitochondrial ATP-synthase, and calcium cycling. The potential contribution of human skeletal muscle to nonshivering thermogenesis is discussed. The differences in nonshivering thermogenesis can partly be attributed to factors such as age, gender, physical fitness, adaptation, and diet. There are indications that genetic variation affect cold response. Summary: The implications of the observed large individual variation in cold response is that a low metabolic response to cold can partly explain increased risk to develop obesity. Both the effect of environmental factors and genetic factors on nonshivering thermogenesis require more well controlled studies. With extended knowledge on these factors it can be ascertained if a pharmacological regimen is possible which would mimic the effects of chronic cold or elevated catecholamine levels, without attendant side effects.

AB - Purpose of review: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic response in infants and several animal species. In adult humans, however, its role is less clear. Here we explore recent findings on the role and variability of nonshivering thermogenesis in adults. Recent findings: Large individual differences exist in mild cold response with respect to the relative contribution of the insulative response and the metabolic (nonshivering) response. In search for the possible explanations of this variation, recent studies on potential mechanisms of nonshivering thermogenesis in humans are presented. Emphasis is given to the role of uncoupling proteins, mitochondrial ATP-synthase, and calcium cycling. The potential contribution of human skeletal muscle to nonshivering thermogenesis is discussed. The differences in nonshivering thermogenesis can partly be attributed to factors such as age, gender, physical fitness, adaptation, and diet. There are indications that genetic variation affect cold response. Summary: The implications of the observed large individual variation in cold response is that a low metabolic response to cold can partly explain increased risk to develop obesity. Both the effect of environmental factors and genetic factors on nonshivering thermogenesis require more well controlled studies. With extended knowledge on these factors it can be ascertained if a pharmacological regimen is possible which would mimic the effects of chronic cold or elevated catecholamine levels, without attendant side effects.

KW - Adaptive thermogenesis

KW - Brown adipose tissue

KW - Cold response

KW - Energy expenditure

KW - Nonshivering thermogenesis

KW - Uncoupling proteins

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1642288230&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00075197-200307000-00018

DO - 10.1097/00075197-200307000-00018

M3 - Review article

VL - 6

SP - 469

EP - 475

JO - Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care

JF - Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care

SN - 1363-1950

IS - 4

ER -