Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

S.A. Zwijsen, D.L. Gerritsen, J.A. Eefsting, M. Smalbrugge, C.M.P.M. Hertogh, A.M. Pot

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout. Objectives: To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff. Design: The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation. Setting: 17 Dutch dementia special care units. Participants: Care staff members of the 17 units. Intervention: The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour. Methods: Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention. Results: Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45%, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95% CI 0.48-1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found. Conclusion: Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job satisfaction, without an increase in job demands.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-74
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studies
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Job Satisfaction
Dementia
Randomized Controlled Trials
Nursing Homes
Hand Strength
Emotions
Education
Equipment and Supplies

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@article{7a406fd9d1c64b389a49042667a9e811,
title = "Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units",
abstract = "Background: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout. Objectives: To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff. Design: The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation. Setting: 17 Dutch dementia special care units. Participants: Care staff members of the 17 units. Intervention: The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour. Methods: Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention. Results: Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45{\%}, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95{\%} CI 0.48-1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found. Conclusion: Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job satisfaction, without an increase in job demands.",
author = "S.A. Zwijsen and D.L. Gerritsen and J.A. Eefsting and M. Smalbrugge and C.M.P.M. Hertogh and A.M. Pot",
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pages = "68--74",
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Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units. / Zwijsen, S.A.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Eefsting, J.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Pot, A.M.

In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 52, No. 1, 2015, p. 68-74.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

AU - Zwijsen, S.A.

AU - Gerritsen, D.L.

AU - Eefsting, J.A.

AU - Smalbrugge, M.

AU - Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

AU - Pot, A.M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout. Objectives: To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff. Design: The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation. Setting: 17 Dutch dementia special care units. Participants: Care staff members of the 17 units. Intervention: The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour. Methods: Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention. Results: Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45%, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95% CI 0.48-1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found. Conclusion: Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job satisfaction, without an increase in job demands.

AB - Background: Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout. Objectives: To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff. Design: The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation. Setting: 17 Dutch dementia special care units. Participants: Care staff members of the 17 units. Intervention: The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour. Methods: Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention. Results: Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45%, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95% CI 0.48-1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found. Conclusion: Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job satisfaction, without an increase in job demands.

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DO - 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.10.003

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EP - 74

JO - International Journal of Nursing Studies

JF - International Journal of Nursing Studies

SN - 0020-7489

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ER -