Computer and internet use among people with long-standing spinal cord injury: a cross-sectional survey in the Netherlands

ALLRISC

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Study design:: Cross-sectional survey Objectives:: To describe computer and Internet use (other than for work or study) among people with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI), examine associations between demographic and lesion characteristics and Internet use, and examine associations between Internet use and mental health, participation, and life satisfaction. Setting:: Community, The Netherlands Methods:: Participants were 265 individuals living with SCI for at least 10 years, who were 18–35 at the onset of SCI, aged 28–65 at the time of the study and wheelchair-user. Scales for General and Health-related Internet use were developed. Results:: Nearly all (97.7%) participants had Internet access and 98.4% of those used it daily or weekly. Of those with tetraplegia, 47.4% had assistive devices for computer use. General Internet use, such as following news and online banking, was very frequent. Websites with information on general health or accessibility were typically visited a few times a year. Three-quarters never visited websites of other individuals with SCI or foreign websites with information on SCI. General Internet use was associated with male gender, younger age, and higher education. Participants with tetraplegia scored higher on Health-related Internet use compared to participants with paraplegia. Health-related Internet use was associated with worse participation, but not with the other psychosocial variables. Conclusion:: Internet has become part of daily life of people with SCI in the Netherlands. However, only one association between Internet use and indicators of psychosocial functioning was found. Possible underuse of adaptive devices and of SCI-specific websites warrant further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSpinal Cord
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Jan 2019

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Spinal Cord Injuries
Internet
Netherlands
Cross-Sectional Studies
Quadriplegia
Health
Self-Help Devices
Wheelchairs
Time and Motion Studies
Paraplegia
Mental Health
Demography
Education
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

@article{e69a1461abfe4af5b9f04527c35e4ee2,
title = "Computer and internet use among people with long-standing spinal cord injury: a cross-sectional survey in the Netherlands",
abstract = "Study design:: Cross-sectional survey Objectives:: To describe computer and Internet use (other than for work or study) among people with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI), examine associations between demographic and lesion characteristics and Internet use, and examine associations between Internet use and mental health, participation, and life satisfaction. Setting:: Community, The Netherlands Methods:: Participants were 265 individuals living with SCI for at least 10 years, who were 18–35 at the onset of SCI, aged 28–65 at the time of the study and wheelchair-user. Scales for General and Health-related Internet use were developed. Results:: Nearly all (97.7{\%}) participants had Internet access and 98.4{\%} of those used it daily or weekly. Of those with tetraplegia, 47.4{\%} had assistive devices for computer use. General Internet use, such as following news and online banking, was very frequent. Websites with information on general health or accessibility were typically visited a few times a year. Three-quarters never visited websites of other individuals with SCI or foreign websites with information on SCI. General Internet use was associated with male gender, younger age, and higher education. Participants with tetraplegia scored higher on Health-related Internet use compared to participants with paraplegia. Health-related Internet use was associated with worse participation, but not with the other psychosocial variables. Conclusion:: Internet has become part of daily life of people with SCI in the Netherlands. However, only one association between Internet use and indicators of psychosocial functioning was found. Possible underuse of adaptive devices and of SCI-specific websites warrant further investigation.",
author = "Post, {Marcel W.M.} and Leenders, {Jacqueline M.P.} and Marga Tepper and Snoek, {Govert J.} and {de Groot}, S. and Janssen, {T. W.J.} and H. Bussmann and C. Smit and M. Sloots and {van Kuppevelt}, D. and H. Rijken and W. Faber and L. Valent and G. Snoek and M. Schuitemaker and F. Woldring and H. Bongers and S. Slangen and M. Wynants and T. Sluis and R. Broeksteeg and C. Dijkstra and P. Luthart and {van der Woude}, {Luc H.V.} and Adriaansen, {Jacinthe J.E.} and ALLRISC",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1038/s41393-018-0237-1",
language = "English",
journal = "Spinal Cord",
issn = "1362-4393",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

Computer and internet use among people with long-standing spinal cord injury : a cross-sectional survey in the Netherlands. / ALLRISC.

In: Spinal Cord, 28.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Computer and internet use among people with long-standing spinal cord injury

T2 - a cross-sectional survey in the Netherlands

AU - Post, Marcel W.M.

AU - Leenders, Jacqueline M.P.

AU - Tepper, Marga

AU - Snoek, Govert J.

AU - de Groot, S.

AU - Janssen, T. W.J.

AU - Bussmann, H.

AU - Smit, C.

AU - Sloots, M.

AU - van Kuppevelt, D.

AU - Rijken, H.

AU - Faber, W.

AU - Valent, L.

AU - Snoek, G.

AU - Schuitemaker, M.

AU - Woldring, F.

AU - Bongers, H.

AU - Slangen, S.

AU - Wynants, M.

AU - Sluis, T.

AU - Broeksteeg, R.

AU - Dijkstra, C.

AU - Luthart, P.

AU - van der Woude, Luc H.V.

AU - Adriaansen, Jacinthe J.E.

AU - ALLRISC

PY - 2019/1/28

Y1 - 2019/1/28

N2 - Study design:: Cross-sectional survey Objectives:: To describe computer and Internet use (other than for work or study) among people with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI), examine associations between demographic and lesion characteristics and Internet use, and examine associations between Internet use and mental health, participation, and life satisfaction. Setting:: Community, The Netherlands Methods:: Participants were 265 individuals living with SCI for at least 10 years, who were 18–35 at the onset of SCI, aged 28–65 at the time of the study and wheelchair-user. Scales for General and Health-related Internet use were developed. Results:: Nearly all (97.7%) participants had Internet access and 98.4% of those used it daily or weekly. Of those with tetraplegia, 47.4% had assistive devices for computer use. General Internet use, such as following news and online banking, was very frequent. Websites with information on general health or accessibility were typically visited a few times a year. Three-quarters never visited websites of other individuals with SCI or foreign websites with information on SCI. General Internet use was associated with male gender, younger age, and higher education. Participants with tetraplegia scored higher on Health-related Internet use compared to participants with paraplegia. Health-related Internet use was associated with worse participation, but not with the other psychosocial variables. Conclusion:: Internet has become part of daily life of people with SCI in the Netherlands. However, only one association between Internet use and indicators of psychosocial functioning was found. Possible underuse of adaptive devices and of SCI-specific websites warrant further investigation.

AB - Study design:: Cross-sectional survey Objectives:: To describe computer and Internet use (other than for work or study) among people with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI), examine associations between demographic and lesion characteristics and Internet use, and examine associations between Internet use and mental health, participation, and life satisfaction. Setting:: Community, The Netherlands Methods:: Participants were 265 individuals living with SCI for at least 10 years, who were 18–35 at the onset of SCI, aged 28–65 at the time of the study and wheelchair-user. Scales for General and Health-related Internet use were developed. Results:: Nearly all (97.7%) participants had Internet access and 98.4% of those used it daily or weekly. Of those with tetraplegia, 47.4% had assistive devices for computer use. General Internet use, such as following news and online banking, was very frequent. Websites with information on general health or accessibility were typically visited a few times a year. Three-quarters never visited websites of other individuals with SCI or foreign websites with information on SCI. General Internet use was associated with male gender, younger age, and higher education. Participants with tetraplegia scored higher on Health-related Internet use compared to participants with paraplegia. Health-related Internet use was associated with worse participation, but not with the other psychosocial variables. Conclusion:: Internet has become part of daily life of people with SCI in the Netherlands. However, only one association between Internet use and indicators of psychosocial functioning was found. Possible underuse of adaptive devices and of SCI-specific websites warrant further investigation.

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U2 - 10.1038/s41393-018-0237-1

DO - 10.1038/s41393-018-0237-1

M3 - Article

JO - Spinal Cord

JF - Spinal Cord

SN - 1362-4393

ER -