Conflict's consequences: Effects of social motives on postnegotiation creative and convergent group functioning and performance

Bianca Beersma*, Carsten K W De Dreu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Two studies tested the effects of social motives during negotiation on postnegotiation group performance. In both experiments, a prosocial or a proself motivation was induced, and participants negotiated in 3-person groups about a joint market. In Experiment 1, groups subsequently performed an advertisement task. Consistent with the authors' predictions, results showed that proself groups performed worse on the convergent aspects of this task but better on the divergent aspects than prosocial groups. In Experiment 2, the authors manipulated social motive and negotiation (negotiation vs. no negotiation), and groups performed a creativity task (requiring divergent performance) or a planning task (requiring convergent performance). Proself groups showed greater dedication, functioned more effectively, and performed better than prosocial groups on the creativity task, whereas prosocial groups showed greater dedication, functioned more effectively, and performed better than proself groups on the planning task, and these effects only occurred when the task was preceded by group negotiation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-374
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume89
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

Keywords

  • Group negotiation
  • Group performance
  • Social motives

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