De-Indianizing Hijra: intra-regional effacements and inequalities in South Asian queer space

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This essay advances a regional critique of the Indian-centric scholarship on hijra, a publicly institutionalized subculture of people typically assigned a male gender at birth who often sacrifice their genitals in return for spiritual power. The unexamined Indian hegemony in hijra studies works to reify not only hijra but also India. Drawing on ethnographic research in Bangladesh, this essay offers preliminary reflections on the need to adopt a regional approach in place of a national frame in studies of gender and sexuality, arguing that hijra subjectivities are constituted at the interstice of intra-, inter-, and transregional comings and goings. The regional approach proposed here also allows us to take into account the intraregional and cross-scalar inequalities within the geopolitically constructed South Asia.
LanguageEnglish
Pages321-331
Number of pages11
JournalTransgender Studies Quarterly
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

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gender
subculture
South Asia
hegemony
Bangladesh
subjectivity
sexuality
India

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De-Indianizing Hijra: intra-regional effacements and inequalities in South Asian queer space. / Hossain, A.

In: Transgender Studies Quarterly, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.08.2018, p. 321-331.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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