Decision-making in a storm of discontent Regulation of pesticides such as glyphosate needs to include societal assessment

Nico M. Van Straalen*, Juliette Legler

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to JournalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    On 12 December 2017, the European Commission reapproved the use of glyphosate, the world's most widely used active ingredient in herbicides and possibly the most heavily debated plant protection product since DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), for another 5-year period (1). Less than a week later, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its draft risk assessment for glyphosate, which concluded that human health risk levels associated with glyphosate exposure from food, drinking water, and residential sources are below the agency's levels of concern (2). Both in Europe and the United States, these decisions faced a storm of public discontent owing to concerns about the possible risks of chemical exposures and the role of large multinational companies. We argue that a broader societal assessment should be included in the decision-making process on pesticide registration.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)958-960
    Number of pages3
    JournalScience
    Volume360
    Issue number6392
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

    Funding

    The authors were not involved in glyphosate risk assessment nor have they any relations with parties in the debate described in this paper. N.M.v.S. is a member of the Netherlands Commission on Genetic Modification.

    FundersFunder number
    Netherlands Space Office

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