Delivering proteins for export from the cytosol.

B.C. Cross, I Sinning, S. Luirink, S. High

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Correct protein function depends on delivery to the appropriate cellular or subcellular compartment. Following the initiation of protein synthesis in the cytosol, many bacterial and eukaryotic proteins must be integrated into or transported across a membrane to reach their site of function. Whereas in the post-translational delivery pathway ATP-dependent factors bind to completed polypeptides and chaperone them until membrane translocation is initiated, a GTP-dependent co-translational pathway operates to couple ongoing protein synthesis to membrane transport. These distinct pathways provide different solutions for the maintenance of proteins in a state that is competent for membrane translocation and their delivery for export from the cytosol. © 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
LanguageEnglish
Pages255-264
JournalNature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Cytosol
Membranes
Proteins
Bacterial Proteins
Guanosine Triphosphate
Adenosine Triphosphate
Maintenance
Peptides

Cite this

Cross, B.C. ; Sinning, I ; Luirink, S. ; High, S. / Delivering proteins for export from the cytosol. In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology. 2009 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 255-264.
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Delivering proteins for export from the cytosol. / Cross, B.C.; Sinning, I; Luirink, S.; High, S.

In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2009, p. 255-264.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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