Development of a hybrid strength training technique for paretic lower-limb muscles

T. L. Bennett*, R. M. Glaser, T. W J Janssen, W. P. Couch, C. J. Herr, J. W. Almeyda, S. H. Petrofsky, P. Akuthota

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book / Report / Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

A hybrid resistance exercise technique for strength training of patients with lower-limb paresis was developed. It consists of electrical stimulation-induced contractions (ESIC) superimposed on voluntary contractions to increase recruitment of motor units and the functional load capability of paretic quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups. The feasibility of this hybrid exercise technique was demonstrated in 10 able-bodied subjects during submaximal isometric contractions by eliciting greater forces than the voluntary contractions at given efforts. Mean (±SE) submaximal voluntary contraction forces (46.4% maximum voluntary contraction forces) for the quadriceps and hamstrings, respectively, were 206.0 ± 18.0 N and 115.9 ± 12.7 N, whereas the hybrid forces were 282.7 ± 30.3 N and 126.1 ± 12.9 N at ES current levels of 55.6±7.9 mA and 51.5±5.7 mA. This represented a 37.2% and an 8.8% increase over the voluntary effort for these muscle groups. Since this hybrid technique recruits additional muscle fibers for stronger contractions, the greater force overload may be more effective for the strength training of patients with lower-limb paresis.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSouthern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
Pages49-52
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 1996
EventProceedings of the 1996 15th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Dayton, OH, USA
Duration: 29 Mar 199631 Mar 1996

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 1996 15th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference
CityDayton, OH, USA
Period29/03/9631/03/96

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