Deviant white matter structure in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder points to aberrant myelination and affects neuropsychological performance

A. Marten H. Onnink, Marcel P. Zwiers, Martine Hoogman, Jeanette C. Mostert, Janneke Dammers, Cornelis C. Kan, Alejandro Arias Vasquez, Aart H. Schene, Jan Buitelaar, Barbara Franke*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood is characterized by gray and white matter abnormalities in several brain areas. Considerably less is known about white matter microstructure in adults with ADHD and its relation with clinical symptoms and cognitive performance. In 107 adult ADHD patients and 109 gender-, age- and IQ-matched controls, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate whole-skeleton changes of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean, axial, and radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD). Additionally, we studied the relation of FA and MD values with symptom severity and cognitive performance on tasks measuring working memory, attention, inhibition, and delay discounting. In comparison to controls, participants with ADHD showed reduced FA in corpus callosum, bilateral corona radiata, and thalamic radiation. Higher MD and RD were found in overlapping and even more widespread areas in both hemispheres, also encompassing internal and external capsule, sagittal stratum, fornix, and superior lateral fasciculus. Values of FA and MD were not associated with symptom severity. However, within some white matter clusters that distinguished patients from controls, worse inhibition performance was associated with reduced FA and more impulsive decision making was associated with increased MD. This study shows widespread differences in white matter integrity between adults with persistent ADHD and healthy individuals. Changes in RD suggest aberrant myelination as a pathophysiological factor in persistent ADHD. The microstructural differences in adult ADHD may contribute to poor inhibition and greater impulsivity but appear to be independent of disease severity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-22
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adult ADHD
  • Cognitive performance
  • Corpus callosum
  • DTI
  • Radial diffusivity
  • Symptom severity

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Deviant white matter structure in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder points to aberrant myelination and affects neuropsychological performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this