Diagnostic accuracy of the edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) for detecting major depression in pregnant and postnatal women: Protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analyses

B.D Thombs, A. Benedetti, L.A. Kloda, B. Levis, K.E. Riehm, M. Azar, P. Cuijpers, S Gilbody, J.P.A. Loannidis, D. McMillan, S.B. Patten, I. Shrier, R.J. Steele, R.C. Ziegelstein, M. Tonelli, N. Mitchell, L. Comeau, J. Schinazi, S. Vigod

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Studies of the diagnostic accuracy of depression screening tools often used data-driven methods to select optimal cut-offs. Typically, these studies report results from a small range of cut-off points around whatever cut-off score is identified as most accurate. When published data are combined in meta-analyses, estimates of accuracy for different cutoff points may be based on data from different studies, rather than data from all studies for each cut-off point. Thus, traditional meta-analyses may exaggerate accuracy estimates. Individual patient data (IPD) metaanalyses synthesise data from all studies for each cutoff score to obtain accuracy estimates. The 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is commonly recommended for depression screening in the perinatal period. The primary objective of this IPD meta-analysis is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the EPDS to detect major depression among women during pregnancy and in the postpartum period across all potentially relevant cut-off scores, accounting for patient factors that may influence accuracy (age, pregnancy vs postpartum). Methods and analysis: Data sources will include Medline, Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. Studies that include a diagnosis of major depression based on a validated structured or semistructured clinical interview administered within 2 weeks of (before or after) the administration of the EPDS will be included. Risk of bias will be assessed with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 tool. Bivariate randomeffects meta-analysis will be conducted for the full range of plausible cut-off values. Analyses will evaluate data from pregnancy and the postpartum period separately, as well as combining data from all women in a single model.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere009742
JournalBMJ Open
Volume5
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Diagnostic accuracy of the edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS) for detecting major depression in pregnant and postnatal women: Protocol for a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analyses'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this