Diamond's 2-billion-year growth charts tectonic shift in early Earth's carbon cycle

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Abstract

A study of tiny mineral 'inclusions' within diamonds from Botswana has shown that diamond crystals can take billions of years to grow. One diamond was found to contain silicate material that formed 2.3 billion years ago in its interior and a 250 million-year-old garnet crystal towards its outer rim, the largest age range ever detected in a single specimen. Analysis of the inclusions also suggests that the way that carbon is exchanged and deposited between the atmosphere, biosphere, oceans and geosphere may have changed significantly over the past 2.5 billion years.
Original languageEnglish
JournalGeochemical News
Volume2017
Issue numberFebruary, 28
Publication statusPublished - 23 Feb 2017

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early Earth
carbon cycle
diamond
tectonics
crystal
biosphere
garnet
silicate
atmosphere
carbon
ocean
mineral

Cite this

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title = "Diamond's 2-billion-year growth charts tectonic shift in early Earth's carbon cycle",
abstract = "A study of tiny mineral 'inclusions' within diamonds from Botswana has shown that diamond crystals can take billions of years to grow. One diamond was found to contain silicate material that formed 2.3 billion years ago in its interior and a 250 million-year-old garnet crystal towards its outer rim, the largest age range ever detected in a single specimen. Analysis of the inclusions also suggests that the way that carbon is exchanged and deposited between the atmosphere, biosphere, oceans and geosphere may have changed significantly over the past 2.5 billion years.",
author = "G.R. Davies and M.U. Gress",
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Diamond's 2-billion-year growth charts tectonic shift in early Earth's carbon cycle. / Davies, G.R.; Gress, M.U.

In: Geochemical News, Vol. 2017, No. February, 28, 23.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticlePopular

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AB - A study of tiny mineral 'inclusions' within diamonds from Botswana has shown that diamond crystals can take billions of years to grow. One diamond was found to contain silicate material that formed 2.3 billion years ago in its interior and a 250 million-year-old garnet crystal towards its outer rim, the largest age range ever detected in a single specimen. Analysis of the inclusions also suggests that the way that carbon is exchanged and deposited between the atmosphere, biosphere, oceans and geosphere may have changed significantly over the past 2.5 billion years.

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