Differentiation between solid-ankle cushioned heel and energy storage and return prosthetic foot based on step-to-step transition cost

Daphne Wezenberg, Andrea G. Cutti, Antonino Bruno, Han Houdijk

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    Decreased push-off power by the prosthetic foot and inadequate roll-over shape of the foot have been shown to increase the energy dissipated during the step-to-step transition in human walking. The aim of this study was to determine whether energy storage and return (ESAR) feet are able to reduce the mechanical energy dissipated during the step-to-step transition. Fifteen males with a unilateral lower-limb amputation walked with their prescribed ESAR foot (Vari-Flex, Ossur; Reykjavík, Iceland) and with a solid-ankle cushioned heel foot (SACH) (1D10, Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany), while ground reaction forces and kinematics were recorded. The positive mechanical work on the center of mass performed by the trailing prosthetic limb was larger (33%, p = 0.01) and the negative work performed by the leading intact limb was lower (13%, p = 0.04) when walking with the ESAR foot compared with the SACH foot. The reduced step-to-step transition cost coincided with a higher mechanical push-off power generated by the ESAR foot and an extended forward progression of the center of pressure under the prosthetic ESAR foot. Results can explain the proposed improvement in walking economy with this kind of energy storing and return prosthetic foot.

    LanguageEnglish
    Pages1579-1590
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
    Volume51
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Heel
    Ankle
    Foot
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Walking
    Lower Extremity
    Iceland
    Amputation
    Biomechanical Phenomena
    Germany
    Extremities
    Pressure

    Keywords

    • Amputation
    • Ankle power
    • Center of mass mechanics
    • ESAR prosthetic foot
    • Gait
    • Lower-limb prosthesis
    • Mechanical energy
    • Roll-over shape
    • SACH prosthetic foot
    • Walking

    Cite this

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    title = "Differentiation between solid-ankle cushioned heel and energy storage and return prosthetic foot based on step-to-step transition cost",
    abstract = "Decreased push-off power by the prosthetic foot and inadequate roll-over shape of the foot have been shown to increase the energy dissipated during the step-to-step transition in human walking. The aim of this study was to determine whether energy storage and return (ESAR) feet are able to reduce the mechanical energy dissipated during the step-to-step transition. Fifteen males with a unilateral lower-limb amputation walked with their prescribed ESAR foot (Vari-Flex, Ossur; Reykjav{\'i}k, Iceland) and with a solid-ankle cushioned heel foot (SACH) (1D10, Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany), while ground reaction forces and kinematics were recorded. The positive mechanical work on the center of mass performed by the trailing prosthetic limb was larger (33{\%}, p = 0.01) and the negative work performed by the leading intact limb was lower (13{\%}, p = 0.04) when walking with the ESAR foot compared with the SACH foot. The reduced step-to-step transition cost coincided with a higher mechanical push-off power generated by the ESAR foot and an extended forward progression of the center of pressure under the prosthetic ESAR foot. Results can explain the proposed improvement in walking economy with this kind of energy storing and return prosthetic foot.",
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    Differentiation between solid-ankle cushioned heel and energy storage and return prosthetic foot based on step-to-step transition cost. / Wezenberg, Daphne; Cutti, Andrea G.; Bruno, Antonino; Houdijk, Han.

    In: Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Vol. 51, No. 10, 2014, p. 1579-1590.

    Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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