Discrimination of second-generation professionals in leadership positions

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This article, based on interviews from the Dutch Pathways to Success Project, investigates how Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch second-generation professionals in leadership positions experience and deal with subtle discrimination at work. We argue that subtle discrimination in organizations remains a reality for second-generation professionals in leadership positions. Because organizations are penetrated by power processes in society at large, these professionals are perceived not only on the basis of their position within the organization, but also on the basis of their marginalized ethnic group background. We show this through the existence of subtle discriminatory practices at three organizational levels-that of supervisors, same-level colleagues and subordinates-which may take place at one or more of these levels. When dealing with subtle discrimination, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch second-generation professionals in leadership positions show an awareness of organizational power and hierarchies. This awareness amounts to various forms of “micro-emancipation” by the second generation-adapted to the organizational level (supervisors, same-level colleagues and subordinates) they are dealing with-that question and challenge subtle discrimination in organizations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-49
JournalSocial Inclusion
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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discrimination
Organizations
leadership
emancipation
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
Interviews
organization
interview
experience
Power (Psychology)

Cite this

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title = "Discrimination of second-generation professionals in leadership positions",
abstract = "This article, based on interviews from the Dutch Pathways to Success Project, investigates how Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch second-generation professionals in leadership positions experience and deal with subtle discrimination at work. We argue that subtle discrimination in organizations remains a reality for second-generation professionals in leadership positions. Because organizations are penetrated by power processes in society at large, these professionals are perceived not only on the basis of their position within the organization, but also on the basis of their marginalized ethnic group background. We show this through the existence of subtle discriminatory practices at three organizational levels-that of supervisors, same-level colleagues and subordinates-which may take place at one or more of these levels. When dealing with subtle discrimination, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch second-generation professionals in leadership positions show an awareness of organizational power and hierarchies. This awareness amounts to various forms of “micro-emancipation” by the second generation-adapted to the organizational level (supervisors, same-level colleagues and subordinates) they are dealing with-that question and challenge subtle discrimination in organizations.",
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Discrimination of second-generation professionals in leadership positions. / Waldring, I.E.; Crul, M.R.J.; Ghorashi, H.

In: Social Inclusion, Vol. 3, No. 4, 2015, p. 38-49.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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